THE FILM WAS UTTER RUBBISH, TO THE EXTENT THAT IT HELD ME..

COLORES INFINITUM

The film was utter rubbish, to the extent that it held me with my television to watch it – a movie in a South Indian language, dubbed in Hindi – as is the norm on Hindi language movie channels these days.

As happens in one of the main plots of masala films, the hero is an honest government official. He advises villagers, in this case (the movie’s), not to deal with the villain and his gang. The rowdy, ruthless villain, who does illegal things with his illicit empire, however succeeds in duping villagers in connivance with a corrupt justice and a cocky lawyer. `

He buys their land at a low price. The very next day the corrupt judge orders higher prices, the market price which the villain had suppressed from coming into public domain, for the piece of land that makes the villain rich by truckload of money.

Villagers, after hearing the court’s order, feel cheated, and approach the main protagonist, the hero, apologising for ignoring his ‘cautionary remarks’ earlier. After a routine display of friendly displeasure, the hero takes up their case. He files complaint against the villain and the parties involved in this duplicitous land deal.

Obviously, as the plot demands, it unnerves the hooligans involved. They hatch a conspiracy. System is with them – corrupt elements of judiciary and police.

I skipped the movie after it as I had some other work. When I came back, the plot angle showing the ultimate supremacy of the villain was to begin. With a truckload of goons and with system in his pocket, gang of the villain raids the hero’s house. Due to his terror, no one in the village comes forward to help the family.

They chain the hero with a tree in his compound. Ladies of the family are subjected to all heinous crimes possible. Hero’s son and father are made to serve the gang with all their demands, including fetching alcoholic liquor for them.

Days go on, with the hero remain strapped to the tree. His beard goes dense and dishevelled, like his whole countenance has become.

After perpetrating more than enough of their barbarities and inflicting severe humiliation on the family, the gang leaves, believing the hero is more than subdued by this time.

Now, the supremacy of their villainous events end here. The plot needs the final act by the hero – taking revenge – killing all those who are responsible for his family’s condition.

His father unchains him from the tree and after routine emotional expressions (shots), he goes straight on the job. He kills the local policemen who were co-opted by the villain – in open public. He is then shown in a jail as he kills the local police station chief outside a police station. There, a senior police officer, who is with the villain, tries to kill the hero. But the hero beats him and is shown climbing up the straight, plastered wall of the jail. The villainous police officer chases him. He follows him on the wall which the hero is shown climbing like a lizard.

The upper periphery of the wall has iron angles charged with electric current. But the current doesn’t affect the hero – a plot requirement I think – while the villainous policeman, who is trying to grab the hero by pulling him down, is thrown away by its shock. And the hero easily escapes.

There, outside the jail, he meets a good samaritan sort of policeman. After the hero pleads, the righteous policeman is shown allowing him to go on his revenge course.

The final moments of the film’s climax begin here. One by one, the hero kills every member of the villain’s gang behind his family’s devastation. The main villain – as the plot requires – is the last one. And as the plot requires – the hero goes on a killing spree in open – and he is supported by children and adults, including his son.

In the end – as the movie requires, keeping its viewers in mind – the hero goes back to the ‘good samaritan policeman’ to surrender.

And as the plot requires – keeping in mind the sentiments of its audience – the ‘good samaritan policeman’ refuses to ‘arrest the hero and send him to the gallows’.

And as happens with a South Indian movie, the hero is shown possessing superhuman powers in this movie also. He is not show physically beaten even when he stands chained to the tree in his house. He is shown mentally and physically superior and as the plot needs – he is also a powerhouse of emotions – and his course doesn’t follow the basic course of logic.

The audiences need his superiority to win in the end – and as written – he wins.

That is one of the typical South Indian masala flicks based on a ‘revenge plot’.

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s