TALE OF TWO APPA RAOS

They both are from Andhra Pradesh (or Telangana).

They both are Appa Raos.

One is controversial because of his controversial tenure as the vice-chancellors of the University of Hyderabad.

The other has become controversial because of the raging controversy around his links with the controversial arms dealer Sanjay Bhandari.

To continue..

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CONSTITUTION AND CORRUPTION

No doubt, the Constitution of India won today, when the Supreme Court of India announced the results of the floor test it ordered to be conducted in the Uttarakhand assembly yesterday.

A democratically elected government that was forced out of the state assembly, thanks to the machinations of the BJP led NDA government, was forced in today with the Constitutional remedy effected by the top court of the country.

We all, who care for democratic norms and India’s federal structure, must be thankful for this moment in our contemporary political history.

But, what about the worrying symptoms that don’t leave even these moments of trust?

Judicial intervention to uphold the Constitutional sovereignty comes with its natural by-product in the prevailing political circumstances of the country – willingly or unwillingly acting as a shield to the corrupt practices going in the backdrop – like we all saw in these months – all that happened in Uttarakhand.

Obviously, whenever such a condition of political uncertainty prevails, horse-trading or selling or buying of legislators becomes the norms of the day. It’s an open secret that all know – be it Uttarkhand or Arunachal or even in case of a minority Union Government.

It went a step ahead in Uttarakhand.

The open secret became bare here.

Congress legislators were caught on camera involved in horse-trading attempt. The whole nation saw it – twice. Even then, Harish Rawat, whose Uttarakhand government has been facing allegations of corruption, looked taking high moral ground today after the apex court made the result of floor test public.

To continue..

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

INDIA CAN’T DO WITHOUT SUBSIDIES – AND IT WANTS TO TAX PROVIDENT FUND!

We are a nation where the urban poverty line is Rs. 47 a day while we think that the rural folks can survive at Rs. 32 a day and we arrived at this wisdom in 2014. When we had done so, we had graduated from the poverty lines of Rs. 27 in rural areas and Rs. 33 in urban areas. This is when you can’t arrange even a modest one time meal in Rs. 32.

This directly says the proportion of real poor, in qualitative terms, based on the average living conditions today, would be much higher that the projected figure of around 30% or less. When you go assessing this poverty mess keeping in mind ‘what should be and what is’, you see this is another equal India within India (or Bharat of the perennial India Vs Bharat debate).

Some 75% of Indians are without any health insurance cover. Majority cannot afford medicines for a sustained treatment regime, let alone the costly surgical processes. The attitude of doctors and support staff in the government run hospitals is even worse than scavengers. Finding good people there tougher than even finding God. People who can afford and can access, try to ignore the government run health facilities. And it across India including the metro cities.

Officially, India’s literacy rate is around 75%. But again, if we see qualitatively, it is the same old story of an equal sized Bharat within India. Our primary school system is languishing with deep holes and leakage in the ambitious Universal Elementary Education programme. Our higher education probably produces the maximum proportion of inept professionals and higher education graduates.

Our economy is consistently witnessing a falling gross savings to GDP ratio – from 34.6% in 2011-12 – to – 31.3% in 2015-16. One way to look at it would that people don’t have wealth in that proportion to save – something that is, naturally, very random and without substance. Or it means people are saving less.

But that doesn’t mean the government should use to a stick to discipline people – like the proponents of the EPF tax proposal including Finance Minister Arun Jaitely said – as a report the Economic Times put forward – “The government had justified the move by saying that it was meant to steer private sector employees towards a pensioned retirement by discouraging lump sum withdrawals, especially for, as experience suggests, conspicuous consumption.”

The finger is being pointed at it rightly – that who is the government to discipline us with our personal preference. Yes, it is good for us when we save more – but then, on a macro scale, it is good for the nation’s economic health as well. But, in the name of that, taxing a man’s life’s savings can never be justified especially when you give people dreams save taxes and build a corpus by investing in the Provident Fund scheme.

And from where this thought of ‘disciplining’ the salaried taxpayer came? When you have such ridiculous poverty lines, when you have millions poor to feed, when you have millions poor to heal, when you have millions poor to educate?

India and Bharat cannot become synonymous until we address these existential questions. Subsidy is now addressed as a ‘burden’ in the lingo being used by the economists but this ‘burden’ is lifeline for India’s millions poor who find it hard even to earn Rs. 47 or Rs. 32 a day.

The government is duty-bound to serve them first – with honesty – with integrity – with consistency. Taxing the middle class with another ‘tax burden’ would not serve any purpose here.

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

CORRUPTION TAX

Now, that is the news of the day – in fact a human-connect story deserving special mention.

Justice Arun Chaudhari of the Nagpur bench of the Bombay High Court today observed that ‘corruption is a hydra-headed monster’ while hearing a fund embezzlement case. He said that time had arrived that we stop paying taxes if the government failed to curb corruption.

This observation is important – even if it is not going to be far reaching – because on the ground nothing is going to change.

Corruption is a malaise that has become chronic in our society – has become a way of life – so much so that we keep on hearing occasional debates on ‘legalizing convenience fee of bets’.

Yes, one way or the other, we all are corrupt, and we all are victims of corruption – but what is basic difference here – between a person who is habitually/chronically corrupt and someone who is forced to be corrupt/who is occasionally corrupt.

Well, most of us are occasional corrupts. We are forced to be part of the wheel based on circumstances and even then most of us don’t go beyond petty, harmless corrupt practices.

But those all of us do something serious that we don’t realize by doing so.

By doing so, we harden even more the souls of those who are chronic corrupts, those for whom corruption has become a way of life, a habitual necessity, a compulsive draw in.

Those some millions, who feed of hundreds of millions of us.

That is the basic difference – of conscience.

While we feel bad in doing something corrupt or unethical, those are hardened souls, enjoy indulging in all, butchery, all savagery, all trickery.

Observation by the High Court judge is important in that context that for the first time a high level member of a constitutional pillar of India has remarked so.

That, in a way, reflect the way our thinking is going – something that was reflected in the unprecedented support to the civil society movement of 2011 that was launched to force the government to take some concrete action on corruption – starting from the Jan Lokpal Bill – to establish an anti-corruption ombudsman.

That shows, hundreds of millions of us, who are forced/occasional corrupts, can take the corrective path based on our conscience – based on flow the society takes. The judge said according to a media report, “The miasma (unholy atmosphere) of corruption can be beaten if all work together. If it continues, taxpayers’ should refuse to pay taxes through a non-cooperation movement.”

Yes, it may seem farfetched but this ‘not paying taxes if the government fails to curb corruption’ is a good thought this sort of ‘corruption tax’ should be taken further.

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

ITS SEMI-OFFICIAL NOW: ANDHRA PRADESH HIGH COURT ASKS POLICE TO REGISTER MURDER CASE IN CHITTOOR ENCOUNTERS

Its official now or its half-official, waiting to be completely official once the courts say so- that is what everyone is saying – obviously except the perpetrators (I take this liberty, based on the reports so far).

Because the agency directly involved with it, the Red Sanders Anti-smuggling Task Force (RSASTF) and the other agencies, the forest officials and the local police and the Andhra Pradesh administration, would not accept it.

Even if the courts say so. Even if the whole world is saying so.

Today, the Andhra Pradesh High Court refuted the report by the Director General of Police of Andhra Pradesh about the encounter in Seshachalam forests near Tirupati in Chittoor district that took away 20 lives.

The High Court instead asked the police to lodger murder report under 302 on allegations about the encounter.

Like everyone, except the ruling dispensation and administration of Andhra Pradesh, the Andhra Pradesh High Court, too, could see the frailty of the police logic.

Sooner or later, the probe has to go to the Central Bureau of Investigation – by High Court or Supreme Court order.

But as the Andhra Pradesh government is swearing by the verity of genuinity of this encounter, which appears to be concretely stage-managed by the very facts of the encounter, the state of bodies, the state of affairs of the encounter with no policeman injured, the crime-scenes, the realpolitik of red sandalwood smuggling, the whole world is finding it hard to digest.

And it was reflected today in the observation by the Andhra Pradesh High Court. The court observed: “Why should not a case of unnatural death under Section 302 of the Indian Penal Code be filed?”

The High Court was also negative about the development that the local police was investigating the incident and a magisterial probe has been ordered when two states were involved (Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh). The court asked that ‘how could local police conduct investigation?, when it was informed so. The state government would clear its stand by April 13.

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

CHITTOOR CONTINUES TO MAKE HEADLINES, AND RIGHTLY!

Chittoor continues to make headlines, and rightly. The dead-bodies are asking for their due if we believe in such things.

Once trophies for police, now the bodies are part of the investigation and as the time is getting up, officials in the operation are feeling the heat.

A report said victim families have requested for ‘no last rites’ for bodies until the investigation is complete.

As more and more truth is coming out, a report today said 12 out of 20 killed are from Tamil Nadu and its chief minister has already written to his counterpart in Andhra Pradesh for a ‘credible probe’.

So, all from Tamil Nadu to 12 from Tamil Nadu would change anything?

No, because the facts increasingly say that it was a stage-managed encounter. People, preferably labourers or small time workers, were killed in cold blood – people with backgrounds and families that they thought could not raise voices.

But the bodies with logs are crying foul of the crime scenes.

Reports said bodies were decomposed. Reports said logs were with white paint having code-word inscribed on them suggesting involvement of some government stockpile. Also the logs were not fresh.

Police have not been able to explain facial shots and burn marks on some of the bodies, apart from routine defence. Then Andhra Pradesh Civil Liberties Committee (APCLC) today paraded a ‘survivor’ of the ‘alleged stage-managed’ encounter. He has been kept somewhere to will be produced before the National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) as the APCLC said.

Police or RSASTF, with local police and forest officials, killed 20 in self-defence and none of the policemen or officials involved were injured. An encounter with hundreds of red-sandalwood smugglers, at multiple locations, 10 Kms away from human dwellings, deep in Seshachalam forests (with a range notorious for red sandalwood smuggling), would certainly involve, if not casualties, then at least injuries to the police and party involved, even if we accept the RSASTF DIG’s remark that ‘his force was superiorly trained’.

But, not just the police, even the forest officials and the local police escaped unharmed, without the bruise, though they had a full-throttle brush with the law and order situation that was expected to leave multiple casualties and injuries.

Though Andhra Pradesh chief minister who is ally of the BJP led National Democratic Alliance and has briefed the Union Home Minister about the whole incident, stoically defends the encounter as genuine while the whole Tamil Nadu is erupting in protests. A TN led seizure of Chittoor is proposed for tomorrow.

And even the Andhra Pradesh is not silent. Rights groups and opposition politicians are making the voices that are being heard.

Chittoor encounter is rightly making for the headlines and is expected to rock the nation more in the coming days with more facts emerging, with more reports saying the encounter stage-managed.

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

CHITTOOR ENCOUNTER: THE QUESTIONS THAT COME TO MIND

THE QUESTIONS

1. What do we call it – Seshachalam encounter or Chittoor Encounter or Tirupati Encounter?

2. So far, the names doing the rounds are Chittoor Encounter and Tirupati Encounter. The ‘alleged’ encounter took place in Seshachalam forests in Chittoor district. Incidentally, the forests surround the Tirupati city that falls in Chittoor district. So, where should the semiotics go? Or, the name doesn’t matter given the scale of the calamity?

3. Should it be termed an encounter or a massacre? Is it a genocide, a stage-managed encounter or a police cleansing operation aimed at the cleaning the society?

4. Did the police do its job? Cannot it separate a woodcutter from a red-sandalwood smuggler? Incidentally, all of those dead are woodcutters, with relatives crying hoarse over their death.

5. The Red Sanders Anti-Smuggling Task Force (RSASTF) of Andhra Pradesh Police, the elite unit – how can it be do dumb and anti-human in killing so many people while none of its members are even seriously injured?

6. How can RSASTF explain decomposed bodies and red-sandalwood logs with white paints and code found at the encounter site?

7. Going by the precedent of Indian policing, there are chances that it is yet another stage-managed encounter, but with an abnormally high death toll. Can we buy the statement of a major person attached with the ground level-ops that they were so well prepared that the smugglers couldn’t harm them?

8. Irrespective of which side is the truth in this case, the police botched it up and botched it up bad. There are 20 dead and they are called smugglers by a police unit with no one injured. Going by the past, security personnel have been killed regularly by red-sanders? Who will buy the police statement then?

9. It was in a dense forest, some 10 Kms from human habitation that the encounters took place. In such circumstances and going by the past history, it is quite bizarre to note it down that police party escaped unharmed and smugglers also chose to attack a fully equipped a police unit with archaic weapons – stones, sickles, axes in this case. Smugglers chose to take on a fully equipped party with archaic weapons only, and that too in a forest, and all policemen escaped unharmed. The whole sequence of events is bizarre, isn’t it?

10. As expected, it has created tension between two states – all the slain are from Tamil Nadu – and the cops are from an elite unit of Andhra Pradesh Police. Aren’t we staring at yet another issue of tussle between two states that will take a long time to resolve?

11. Rights groups from both states as well as the national and international bodies have taken note of the incident. NHRC (National Human Rights Commission) has taken suo moto cognizance. Hearing a petition to launch CBI inquiry into the case, the High Court today asked the Andhra Pradesh government to file a written submission in the case within two days. Amnesty International has written on it. A storm is brewing that is to snowball in coming days. Isn’t is going to cost dear to the RSASTF and therefore the state government?

12. No one from the state government so far has taken the ‘responsibility’ or ‘laurels’ except the officials directly involved in it. A magisterial probe has been ordered. Chandrababu Naidu is tight-lipped. Ministry of Home Affair at Centre has been briefed by him. Tamil Nadu CM O. Panneerselvam is demanding a ‘credible’ probe. Opposition parties and Andhra Pradesh and political parties in Tamil Nadu have created a big issue over the ‘alleged’ encounter and it is going to get heightened as more and more truth comes out. Is the episode a setback for Chandrababu Naidu? Is he dealing with the another ‘Hashimpura’ with South India’s biggest encounter of the history?

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

SESHACHALAM ENCOUNTER: NOW THAT IS EXPECTED TO BE ONE OF LEAD STORIES OF COMING DAYS

Going by the precedent, this one is expected to be the cover-story stuff for many magazines, front-page and follow-up stuff for newspapers and for hot debates on news channels.

The Red Sanders Anti-Smuggling Task Force (RSASTF) of Andhra Pradesh Police today claimed to kill 20 red sandalwood smugglers during its encounters with a team of woodcutters.

Reportedly, a team of sandalwood smugglers had sneaked from the Tamil Nadu districts, Tiruvannamalai and Salem, to the Seshachalam forests of Andhra Pradesh in Chittoor district surrounding the Tirupati City and the police team acted on the tip-off.

In the encounters that lasted for hours and took place deep in the forest, reportedly 10 Kms from human habitation, left 20 smugglers dead but only few of the police party got injured and they, too, were out of danger. Some reports also said that none of the ‘officials and policemen were injured in the incident’.

The police party was fully equipped and was with sophisticated weapons while the so-called smugglers were with stones, rods, sickles, and axes.

Now, the whole stuff is a copybook police encounter where police pick up some (but not many, ideally one or two) notorious gangsters and show them killed in an encounter when the reality is that the police group shoots them in cold blood. The whole encounter is stage-managed.

In case of disturbed areas with elements like terrorism, naxalism and other forms of internal insurgency, the notorious gangsters are sometimes replaced with harmless poor people whose relatives cannot prove anything on their own.

In case of Chittoor encounter, in its Seshachalam forests, the toll is 20, a significantly higher number by standards of even the Indian Army in such cases. Also, the victim bodies lying here and there were not of notorious gangsters as the initial reports suggested. Instead, they were of ordinary, poor men as the photographs of encounter suggested.

Also, Chittoor is a drought affected district facing a prolonged drought. Governments come and go but the problems remain the same.

It is not just India media, but the global media will pick this story and some which are adept in follow-ups and some which are having some socialist or anti-capitalist leanings will make war-cry about it.

The story, by its death toll and its location is expected to make big headlines and news content tomorrow onwards. Already, a magisterial enquiry by the government has been ordered into it.

The interstate tension between Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu will see an element to spark the fires. Tamil Nadu chief minister O. Panneerelvam has written to his Andhra Pradesh counterpart for a ‘credible probe’ into the issue as all the slain are from Tamil Nadu.

Whether to term it a genuine encounter or stage-managed massacre is going to be question doing the rounds.

‘The decomposed bodies and logs there with white paint and code-words’ is a big story for national and international media, the political groups in Tamil Nadu, the opposition political groups in Andhra Pradesh, the political groups elsewhere and national and international rights groups.

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

SUPREME COURT’S BCCI/IPL VERDICT: REFRESHINGLY ENGAGING

Reading it is refreshingly engaging.

By the nature of the issue in question, some Supreme Court judgements become landmark, redefining the way the matter concerning the issue would be seen in future.

That is going to be the case with Cricket after the yesterday’s verdict by the Supreme Court of India. Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI), an outfit draped in secrecy so far, manages affairs of cricket in India and is largely responsible for bringing bad name to the game, a game that has been a mass phenomenon in India, making Indian cricketers and the Indian Board richest among their peers in the world fraternity.

The IPL Spot Fixing Verdict by the Supreme Court Bench of Justice T. S. Thakur and Justice Fakkir Mohamed Ibrahim Kalifulla has the potential to change the way BCCI has managed the affairs of the game so far, and is for good, aiming to bring and strengthen the elements of transparency and answerability in cricket’s administration in India.

The some 130 pages verdict focuses heavily on cleaning the game with observations like:

“Such is the passion for this game in this country that cricketers are seen as icons by youngsters, middle aged and the old alike. Any organization or entity that has such pervasive control over the game and its affairs and such powers as can make dreams end up in smoke or come true cannot be said to be undertaking any private activity.”

“The BCCI has in no uncertain terms declared its resolve to protect the fundamental imperatives constituting the essence of the game of cricket and its determination to take every step in its power to prevent corrupt betting practices undermining the integrity of the sport including any effort to influence the outcome of any match. Unfortunately, however, the amendment to Rule 6.2.4 (allowing BCCI administrators to have commercial interests in BCCI products like IPL) clearly negates the declarations and resolves of the BCCI by permitting situations in which conflict of interest would grossly erode the confidence of the people in the authenticity, purity and integrity of the game.”

“An amendment which strikes at the very essence of the game as stated in the Anti Corruption Code cannot obviously co-exist with the fundamental imperatives.”

“Conflict of interest situation is a complete anti-thesis to everything recognized by BCCI as constituting fundamental imperatives of the game hence unsustainable and impermissible in law.”

“The question is whether the BCCI can afford to see the game lose its credibility in the eyes of those who watch it, by allowing an impression to gather ground that what goes on in the name of the game is no more than a farce because of sporting frauds like betting, match fixing and the like.”

“Can the BCCI live with the idea of the game being seen only as a means to cheat the unsuspecting and gullible spectators watching the proceedings whether in the stadium or on the television with the passion one rarely sees in any other sporting enterprise.”

“BCCI’s commercial plans for its own benefit and the benefit of the players are bound to blow up in smoke, if the people who watch and support the game were to lose interest or be indifferent because, they get to know that some business interests have hijacked the game for their own ends or that the game is no longer the game they know or love because of frauds on and off the field.”

“There is no manner of doubt whatsoever that the game enjoys its popularity and raises passions only because of what it stands for and because the people who watch the sport believe that it is being played in the true spirit of the game without letting any corrupting influence come anywhere near the principles and fundamental imperatives considered sacrosanct and inviolable.”

“All told whatever be the format of the game and whatever be the commercial angles to it, the game is what it is, only if it is played in its pristine form free from any sporting fraud.”

“The fundamental imperatives, to which BCCI is avowedly committed in the Anti Corruption Code, cannot be diluted leave alone neglected or negated.”

“BCCI is a very important institution that discharges important public functions. Demands of institutional integrity are, therefore, heavy and need to be met suitably in larger public interest. Individuals are birds of passage while institutions are forever. The expectations of the millions of cricket lovers in particular and public at large in general, have lowered considerably the threshold of tolerance for any mischief, wrong doing or corrupt practices which ought to be weeded out of the system.”

And as a natural corollary, major part of the verdict deliberates on addressing the issue of ‘conflict of interest’ and its unethical realms engulfing BCCI and how BCCI is answerable to the people of India with its ‘public duties’.

“The functions of the Board are clearly public functions, which, till such time the State intervenes to takeover the same, remain in the nature of public functions, no matter discharged by a society registered under the Registration of Societies Act.”

Cricket has been like a religion in India. If we have discourses like ‘cricket’s ungentlemanly avatar’ or ‘cricket losing popularity in India’ or ‘cricket is no more a religion in India’, BCCI has to carry the blame for it, because in the blind rush to maintain a tight grip on its culture of secrecy and ‘cronyism’ and to further the vested interests as with commercialization came the increased wealth creation opportunities, the BCCI top brass started going even lower, breaking all norms of probity and N. Srinivasan was its worst manifestation.

That worst manifestation saw its spell lifting yesterday.

IPL Fixing

SUPREME COURT’S BCCI/IPL VERDICT: REFRESHINGLY ENGAGING

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey–https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

IPL VERDICT: SEVEN QUESTIONS SUPREME COURT’S VERDICT IS BASED ON

The seven questions the Supreme Court deliberated on to lay down the roadmap to the further course of action to clean BCCI, to cleanse Indian Cricket to take the IPL Spot Fixing probe to its final conclusion are:

1. If BCCI comes under judicial review?

The apex court says yes. The Verdict reads – BCCI may not be State under Article 12 of the Constitution but is certainly amenable to writ jurisdiction under Article 226 of the Constitution of India.

2. If Gurunath Meiyappan and Raj Kundra were team officials and if they were involved in betting?

The court says yes to both.

3. If Gurunath Meiyappan and Raj Kundra were team officials and if they were found guilty, what would be the future course of action?

The verdict copy reads – The misconduct against these two individuals is actionable as per the relevant rules to which we have referred in detail. Not only that, we have held that action under the rules can also be taken against the franchisees concerned. We have noticed that that the quantum of sanction/punishment can vary depending upon the gravity of the misconduct of the persons committing the same.

4. If N Srinivasan was involved in covering-up the IPL Spot Fixing episode?

The court says no – but not without making scathing remarks on Srinivasan’s overall conduct, putting him in the dock. The verdict says the allegation wasn’t proved but it doesn’t mean the allegation was baseless. The court does accepts the ‘element of suspicion’ on the part of Srinivasan’s conduct in the spot-fixing cover-up affair.

5. If the BCCI amendment of its Regulation 6.4.2 allowing its administrators to have commercial interests in IPL, Champions League and Twenty-20 was legally unethical and unacceptable?

The court says yes, it was ‘legally bad’ – The Amendment to Rule 6.2.4 permitting Administrators of BCCI to acquire or hold commercial interests in BCCI like IPL, champions league and T-20 held to be bad.

The court struck down the amendment saying Srinivasan’s simultaneous roles as the BCCI chief and IPL team owner were a clear-cut case of ‘conflict of interest’ and the conduct was not acceptable and Srinivasan needed to choose between BCCI and IPL.

6. If Sundar Raman, the IPL Chief Operating Officer (COO) was guilty?

The Supreme Court has ordered further probe on Sundar Raman’s role in the IPL Spot Fixing scandal, placing him firmly under scanner.

The verdict elaborates: Mr. Sundar Raman was, and continues to be the Chief Operating Officer of IPL. He has held and continues to hold a very important position in the entire system. On his own showing he was dealing with practically all aspects of organization of the game, including facilitating whenever necessary the appearance and participation of celebrities and organizing tickets, accreditation cards and such other matters. He was, therefore, the spirit behind the entire exercise and cannot be said to be unconcerned with what goes on in the course of the tournament especially if it has the potential of bringing disrepute to the game/BCCI.

We are, therefore, not inclined to let the allegations made against Mr. Sundar Raman go un-probed, even if it means a further investigation by the investigating team provided to the probe committee or by any other means. Truth about the allegations made against Mr. Sundar Raman, must be brought to light, for it is only then that all suspicions about the fraudulent activities and practices floating in the media against the BCCI and its administrators in several proceedings before different courts can be given a quietus.

7. What should be the future course of action – on cleaning BCCI and cleansing Cricket run by it and taking the IPL Spot Fixing probe to its finality?

Giving directions on N Srinivasan, Sundar Raman, Raj Kundra, Gurunath Meiyappan, Chennai Super Kings, Rajasthan Royals, BCCI and IPL Spot Fixing episode – the court formed a three member committed to be headed by R. M. Lodha, former Chief Justice – to probe the matter further and to come with guidelines on revamping BCCI – with a deadline of six months. Ashok Bhan and R. V. Raveendran, former Supreme Court judges are other members of the committee.

IPL Fixing

IPL VERDICT: SEVEN QUESTIONS SUPREME COURT’S VERDICT IS BASED ON

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey–https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/