LOVE – SOUTH INDIAN FILMS STYLE!

Funny – at its most insane!
Boisterous – at its most verbose!
Pampered – at its most mollycoddled!
Rowdy – at its most gaudy!
Outrageous – at its most audacious!
Cosmetic – at its most superficial!
Melodrama – at its most dramatic!

The hero:

  • Drives auto-rickshaw, or,
  • Is a bicycle riding college student, or,
  • Is a street vendor of vada-pao, or,
  • A goonda living in a slum.

The heroine:

  • Is from heaven.
  • From a family of high and mighty politicians, or,
  • A larger than life businessman, or,
  • A mafia Don flying in chartered plane.

Rarely, the narrative is developed with role-reversals.

Either the hero approaches the heroine or the heroine has the ‘instantaneous’ love-at-first-sight, no time is wasted in coming to the point – its direct and precise – irrespective of the ‘class’ difference – without going into details – like smooth and efficient!

Love happens so readily – only after few sitcom scenes – and the glues is so strong – that you feel that these films are the true representatives of a ‘classless’ society.

Either love is so ripe or directors are so experienced in these movies that they don’t waste any moment in nuances of going ‘in between the lines’ – or they refuse to see the beauty there that others see!

True post-modernists! Iconoclasts in their own league – so much so – that they have started a league of their own, their ‘own Masala’ within the larger ‘Masala Films’ genre! Proponents and followers of Communism should take their worldview (social take) on society seriously!

(P.S. – While randomly picking up a Dhanush’s movie on TV!)

(P.S. – South Indian cinema produces some of the finest movies in India every year. This is just about the so-called mainstream gibberish that is so prevalent even in the Mumbai cinema or the Hindi film industry – though, even there loves doesn’t happen so readily – and is certainly not ‘class-less’!)

🙂 

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

WHEN YOU LOVE REVENGE FLICKS

And not when you watch them as time-pass entertainment or a conscious film watcher to see how a particular narrative has been developed:

It is because of the human psychology in a society like India where VIP culture is deeply rooted as a cultural practice (or malaise) – where we all, more or less, at some point of time or regularly – face (or feel) its brunt – and the main protagonist of the movie is shown taking on such (rogue) VIP elements.

It is because such films give wing to our fantasy that craves (and at times cribs) because of the fundamentally feeble nature of human beings who have been harassed by rogue (or corrupt) elements – something that we all face – and find ourselves forced to compromise. Yes, exceptions are there but then it is not yet time for any of them to become norm in our society.

And we can see they vary according to the subsets of societies in India – like South Indian flicks portray an ‘all supercharged, superhuman like hero’ who first faces life’s troubles due to bad elements (VIPs – politicians, police, criminals with VIP sort of stature) – and then take on them with a force that dwarfs even the best bravado shown in the films made in Mumbai – because VIP culture or personality cult worship in India is most deeply ingrained in the South Indian culture.

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

MISFIT BARE BRICKS WALL, LADY, ASPIRING-RAPIST, AND ELEPHANT THE SAVIOUR..

In a palatial mansion, well fortified, with guards and otherwise, there is a wall, unplastered, of single row of bricks, looking ugly and totally out of place, like a blot on a serene landscape, like a patch on an Armani suit, waiting to be razed down.

On the inside of the wall, the villain, clad in a horse-riding sort of outfit, is vigorously trying to rape a woman. The woman is crying for help, in the mansion, guarded by a number of goondas in all shapes, sizes and colours.

Tension is building. Anger is simmering. When it reaches to the helping ears, away somewhere, riding on the waves of telepathy, it starts boiling. And the helping ears rush to help.

A big bang!! A loud noise is splashed across.

And the ugly, out of place bare bricks wall is suddenly down, receiving it’s freedom, away from this palatial mansion that is phony by the standards of the existence of the wall.

Now, the helping ears are in, right on the job, righteously and earnestly, riding on the waves of emotionally charged energy.

An elephant in teens is in on rampage in the mansion, beating and throwing the goondas here and there, chasing the ‘aspiring rapist’ owner of the mansion.

He is the saviour and he is here now. The tension is reaching its crescendo. Chairs are clutched more tightly and eyes are fixated more emotively.

Though the goons are giving him a tough fight, he is outmatching them, making whirlwind rounds of the hall of the mansion, it’s rooms, even running up the stairs.

As the good Vs evil fight progresses, more and more goondas are biting dust.

Now, the boiling point of anger is right here.

And the intensity of it has sent the goondas packing, broken and aching. Desperate and running, the ‘aspiring-rapist’ reaches to his gun somehow and is now taking aim.

There is pin drop silence in the ambience. The watchers have left grazing midway.

But..but, while taking aim, the daddy goonda, the ‘aspiring-rapist’ had not seen the elephant in teens reaching right on his neck, charging towards him bringing down the pillars of the mansion in the hall, already uprooted by the sheer force of the teen elephant’s anger and waiting to be pushed only to clear the way.

The saviour is upon him now, ready to snatch the gun. And lo n behold! The gun is snatched and thrown away by the saviour. The next moment, the daddy goonda is within full grip of our teen hero. In a stylishly choreographed move, he tosses the villain up and away.

Bang again! A glass wall is smashed down and the daddy goonda is on the floor of the next hall of the palatial mansion.

Now bruised and devoid of his supporting brigade, fear of life takes over him. He sees his death in the ferocious eyes of the saviour. He makes a speedy drift to run away, to find a way out, and there he goes, saving his life from the ongoing wrath of the saviour.

The atmosphere is emotionally supercharged now.

Finding the ground cleared, now the saviour, the elephant in teens, looks back for the lady and here she is, safe and unharmed.

It releases the tension of the grazers and they are back munching while watching the emotional reunion of the caller and the called.

Tears are in their natural free flow mode. Many of the viewers in the theatre are clapping, with tearful eyes. Some of them have left even their seats in the excitement of the emotionally supercharged ambience.

The chatter, relieved and excited at the same time, is praising the saviour for his heroism and its timeliness while graduating to the next scene.

The Classic Indian Masala Cinema
Jai Ho Jai Ho

— thoughts, forced to go expressive, while watching a random movie scene —

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/