TALE OF TWO APPA RAOS

They both are from Andhra Pradesh (or Telangana).

They both are Appa Raos.

One is controversial because of his controversial tenure as the vice-chancellors of the University of Hyderabad.

The other has become controversial because of the raging controversy around his links with the controversial arms dealer Sanjay Bhandari.

To continue..

CONSTITUTION AND CORRUPTION

No doubt, the Constitution of India won today, when the Supreme Court of India announced the results of the floor test it ordered to be conducted in the Uttarakhand assembly yesterday.

A democratically elected government that was forced out of the state assembly, thanks to the machinations of the BJP led NDA government, was forced in today with the Constitutional remedy effected by the top court of the country.

We all, who care for democratic norms and India’s federal structure, must be thankful for this moment in our contemporary political history.

But, what about the worrying symptoms that don’t leave even these moments of trust?

Judicial intervention to uphold the Constitutional sovereignty comes with its natural by-product in the prevailing political circumstances of the country – willingly or unwillingly acting as a shield to the corrupt practices going in the backdrop – like we all saw in these months – all that happened in Uttarakhand.

Obviously, whenever such a condition of political uncertainty prevails, horse-trading or selling or buying of legislators becomes the norms of the day. It’s an open secret that all know – be it Uttarkhand or Arunachal or even in case of a minority Union Government.

It went a step ahead in Uttarakhand.

The open secret became bare here.

Congress legislators were caught on camera involved in horse-trading attempt. The whole nation saw it – twice. Even then, Harish Rawat, whose Uttarakhand government has been facing allegations of corruption, looked taking high moral ground today after the apex court made the result of floor test public.

To continue..

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

CORRUPTION TAX

Now, that is the news of the day – in fact a human-connect story deserving special mention.

Justice Arun Chaudhari of the Nagpur bench of the Bombay High Court today observed that ‘corruption is a hydra-headed monster’ while hearing a fund embezzlement case. He said that time had arrived that we stop paying taxes if the government failed to curb corruption.

This observation is important – even if it is not going to be far reaching – because on the ground nothing is going to change.

Corruption is a malaise that has become chronic in our society – has become a way of life – so much so that we keep on hearing occasional debates on ‘legalizing convenience fee of bets’.

Yes, one way or the other, we all are corrupt, and we all are victims of corruption – but what is basic difference here – between a person who is habitually/chronically corrupt and someone who is forced to be corrupt/who is occasionally corrupt.

Well, most of us are occasional corrupts. We are forced to be part of the wheel based on circumstances and even then most of us don’t go beyond petty, harmless corrupt practices.

But those all of us do something serious that we don’t realize by doing so.

By doing so, we harden even more the souls of those who are chronic corrupts, those for whom corruption has become a way of life, a habitual necessity, a compulsive draw in.

Those some millions, who feed of hundreds of millions of us.

That is the basic difference – of conscience.

While we feel bad in doing something corrupt or unethical, those are hardened souls, enjoy indulging in all, butchery, all savagery, all trickery.

Observation by the High Court judge is important in that context that for the first time a high level member of a constitutional pillar of India has remarked so.

That, in a way, reflect the way our thinking is going – something that was reflected in the unprecedented support to the civil society movement of 2011 that was launched to force the government to take some concrete action on corruption – starting from the Jan Lokpal Bill – to establish an anti-corruption ombudsman.

That shows, hundreds of millions of us, who are forced/occasional corrupts, can take the corrective path based on our conscience – based on flow the society takes. The judge said according to a media report, “The miasma (unholy atmosphere) of corruption can be beaten if all work together. If it continues, taxpayers’ should refuse to pay taxes through a non-cooperation movement.”

Yes, it may seem farfetched but this ‘not paying taxes if the government fails to curb corruption’ is a good thought this sort of ‘corruption tax’ should be taken further.

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

HD KUMARASWAMY IS THE MOST HONEST OF THE LOT

HD Kumaraswamy is the most honest of the lot – it is proved thus – he accepted the merit of what everyone else was hesitant about.

He has dared to venture beyond – where no other politician, big and small – had ventured so far.

And he has accepted it in a grand style – going all across – addressing whosoever seeks to approach him.

And he firmed his position on it every time a hostile question was thrown at him – his iteration was perfect every time – his tone sharpening every time.

We have been listening to about cash-for-seat, cash-for-vote and horse-trading medleys in Indian politics for a long time.

But no one accepts it unless it is otherwise, unless someone is caught on the wrong side of the law, and is forced to accept it.

The logical way out of this is to place this practice on the right side of the law.

Tickets of political parties on sale during elections, especially in elections involving indirect voting process like the Rajya Sabha or the state legislative councils polls, prices being propositional to the weight and the prospects of the political party, has been a seasoned open secret.

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ADARSH SCAM REPORT REJECTED: RAHUL GANDHI JUST MISSED YET ANOTHER OPPORTUNITY

Symbolically shambolic or shambolically symbolic! – “Biggest issue is corruption, it is an unacceptable burden on our people. We must fight corruption”

Rahul Gandhi, was, again, delivering a speech remixing the verbal elements of his speechmaking which we have become so familiar with. He was discussing the problems of India with corporate leaders. And he again spoke on corruption, in his usual style, talking big, when the acts of the many of the Congress leaders directly defy his words. In fact, if we go by the need to set the precedent, even his family needs to come clean on corruption allegations on Robert Vadra, his brother-in-law.

Anyway, that is the regular, usual stuff, keeps on happening, and keeps on defying Rahul’s words.

This time, the push for writing this came from a coincidental turn of events involving Rahul Gandhi, Congress, a speech on corruption and an act of corruption cover-up.

On December 20, the Adarsh Housing Society scam report was tabled in the Maharashtra assembly and summarily rejected by the state government. The chief minister of Maharashtra, Prithviraj Chavan, considered relatively clean on corruption, didn’t give any reason.

The report was prepared by a two-member commission (Adarsh Commission) headed by a retired Justice of the Bombay High Court, JA Patil, to look into the allegations of corruption and irregularities in the construction of Adarsh Housing Cooperative Society in Mumbai.

The report indicted four farmer Maharashtra chief ministers and Congress politicians including Sushilkumar Shinde, the Union Home Minister now, and Ashok Chavan and Vilasrao Deshmukh, former chief ministers of Maharashtra. With many bureaucrats, the report also indicted two influential NCP politicians who are ministers in the Maharashtra cabinet.

This happened on December 20, Friday.

On December 21, Saturday, Rahul addressed the corporate leaders at FICCI Annual General Meeting, talking big again on corruption.

How hollow, how disconnected such statements sound when the reality defies them upfront; when the reality and such statements by Rahul Gandhi become extremes to bridge the gap?

It is as counterfeit as Congress rushing to take credit of passing the Lokpal Bill even if the Congress is the main culprit to let the Bill linger for almost 45 years!

“Corruption is bleeding our people dry. It is an unacceptable burden on the people of our nation. We must fight corruption with all our strength and determination” – how could Rahul speak so, on December 21, addressing the FICCI AGM – just a day after his party’s government and chief minister rejected an impartial judicial commission report on a scam that shook the nation and cost a chief minister his chair?

It was really an opportunity missed and it also tells Rahul and Congress didn’t learn anything from the recent poll humiliations in Delhi, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan and Chhattisgarh and from AAP’s unprecedented victory in Delhi. On December 8 evening, Rahul Gandhi had conceded the defeat saying his party needed to learn from AAP. Corruption and anti-establishment demands anti- the ‘present system of governance’ were the major poll planks of AAP, or the Aam Aadmi Party.

Had it been a serious thought on December 8 evening when the election results of four states were announced, we would not have seen happening what happened on December 20 in Maharashtra.

The time is running out. Talking big and talking radical is not going to help. Such a veil cannot be maintained for long and the prevailing political circumstances make it imperative for Rahul and Congress to change when the electorate is ready for political experiments like AAP. Yes, AAP is not beyond valid reasons of doubt, but it is certainly a point to begin.

Rahul and Congress need to act now, and given the mess, the political abyss, they are in, they need to act radically.

Adarsh Commission report could have been an opportunity to begin but it has been missed. A positive approach on the Adarsh Commission enquiry report, indicting big names, would certainly be a fitting, radical anti-corruption step taken.

The ‘change in politics’ that Rahul Gandhi has been talking about, even more repeatedly after his elevation as the Congress Vice-president, needs ‘politics of change’ that is much bigger than saving a Sushilkumar Shinde.

Mr. Gandhi you must, (if not react on), read and think over what Justice Patil said on rejection of his report: “We have a clear idea in our mind of what happened (referring to the Adarsh scam). Based on that we submitted our report after recording the evidence of several witnesses and perusing relevant documents. The findings were not palatable to the government and hence it must have been rejected.”

Start acting. It is already too late!

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

LOKPAL: THE ‘COMPROMISED’ BILL IS LOGICAL ENOUGH TO BEGIN WITH

We are always free to demand for more and we will..

There have been debates and there will be debates on effectiveness of the just passed Lokpal Bill, to create an anti-corruption ombudsman. Some would dismiss. Some would extol. Some would remain skeptical and would prefer to wait and watch.

What was being demanded by the civil society was not a practical one. What was being given by the government was not an acceptable one.

But, the Bill passed ‘finally’ by the Indian Parliament on December 18, can be seen, more or less as an acceptable one to begin with. Broadly, it paves the way for an ombudsman that if implemented in time, with proper infrastructure and with supportive legislations like the Citizen Charter Bill, the Judicial Accountability Bill and the Whistleblowers Protection Bill can prove really effective in spite of the reservations over many of its provisions.

The need is to develop a good ecosystem with all these constituents. Yes, we all know it’s easier said than done. And given the prevalence of political opportunism in India, we know it’s not going to be easy.

But, at least, we have a point to begin now.

The fight has been a long and circuitous one and this outcome should not be seen as a washout and should not be rejected outright. The Bill was to be passed and was to be enacted if we had to move ahead, from planning to implementations stage.

And if it could happen so, finally, after 45 or 50 years, any which way we want to look at it, it owes much to the hugely successful anti-corruption movement of 2011, especially its April and August legs that bolsters the feeling the Indians are learning to express their displeasure more and more expressively, more and more aggressively.

And that is a point to reflect on, to hope positively that an anti-corruption ecology around the Lokpal, with some other corresponding laws, can be created.

The basic requirement is the pressure from the public and its manifestation. It is good that public is increasingly expressing itself, more and more, and spontaneously, with or without a leader, as happened during the 2011 anti-corruption movement led by Anna Hazare, as happened during the huge leaderless public protests in the aftermath of December 16 Delhi gangrape and recently in the unprecedented electoral mandate to the Aam Aadmi Party in Delhi assembly polls, a party that fought on the issue of corruption and successfully exploited the public sentiments mobilized after the 2011 anti-corruption movement.

So, there is an ecology of pressure being built up. And on its target are the present ways of administration and governance by the mainstream political parties of India.

On the face of it, there are many good points in the Lokpal Bill/Act cleared. It has power to prosecute. It can check every government official including the prime minister. The process of Lokpal’s appointment and dismissal is fairly logical.

These basic rules to establish and govern the institution of the anti-corruption ombudsman are broad enough to give it a good enough space to breath, to make others suffocate.

See the good precedent set by the Election Commission of India and the Comptroller & Auditor General of India, both chosen by the Indian government. The regularly increasing voter turn-out election after election and clean and violence-free elections or consistent reports putting the government on back-foot on corruption and scams like 2G, different land and defense deals have become benchmarks of the Indian Democracy.

So, there is no reason to dismiss the Lokpal even before it starts working, when it has good enough autonomy to begin with.

It is true it is a ‘compromised’ bill with politicians putting their ‘sincere’ efforts to dilute it as much as they could in the prevailing sociopolitical scenario. So, there is some tough fighting ahead to iron out the difficulties once the institution gets operational. Even in that case, it would be much easier to bring amendments to introduce the required element of reform than not having the Lokpal at all.

One of the most talked about omissions is excluding the lower bureaucracy from Lokpal’s purview areas. That is a concern area but it is not something that can not be added later provided there is intent or there is pressure to do so.

If public pressure can panic the politicians to the extent that they can pass the Bill in just 10 days after Congress routing in Delhi, Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh and AAP’s grand entry in Delhi in the election results announced on December 8, it can certainly push them to do so.

While a government of an outfit like AAP should happily, on its own, weed out the weaker elements, even a government of any of the mainstream political party would not be able to skirt the demand then, in an environment of a more aware electorate and more alert activists amid an increasing presence of alternative political parties and politicians like AAP or Arvind Kejriwal. AAP’s success in Delhi is bound to give India more of honest, young and unorthodox politicians in the days to come.

Alternatively, there can be this relevant afterthought. Corruption has made every part of the Indian administrative and governance machinery largely sluggish and docile.

As it affects every sphere of Indian life, its social, political and commercial activities, it has exported corruption to almost every section of Indian society, free of caste, class, religion and regional divides. It has made corruption interdependent and interrelated.

So, in a way, if we say, if we can check the corruption in the government at top level, setting some tough precedents, it can set in motion a ripple effect, that, though will take time, will trickle down to other participants, the NGO people, the lower-ranked bureaucracy and the corporate people, who are not covered under the Lokpal Act.

If there can be a check at the top level corruption, and if there can be some tough and landmark punitive action taken, some examples on this line, it will send down a clear message.

Also, when the government corruption at top level would see its avenues to earn easy money being squeezed out, it would certainly feel unhappy to see others still milking the cow.

Nothing like rocket science in thinking so – if they cannot eat, they will not let others eat – if they cannot earn easy money – they will not let others do so – the forced honesty!

So, in checking them, they would be more and more impartial, would be increasingly objective and detached.

Just an afterthought!

But I am not daydreaming folks! The Lokpal is here and that is a good sign; that is a logical reason to prepare for the next stage of the fight – to let it evolve into an effective institution.

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

RAHUL GANDHI CONVICTS ‘CONVICTED NETAS’ ORDINANCE: WHY IT IS PREMATURE TO TRUST HIS ‘DELAYED’ CONSCIENCE?

Because, the Representation of the People (Amendment and Validation) Bill, 2013, brought by the United Progressive Alliance’s (UPA) government led by the Congress is very much alive and kicking.

Rajya Sabha has already passed it. Disruptions didn’t allow it in the Loksabha in the Monsoon Session but it is slated to be presented and passed in the lower House of the Indian Parliament in the Winter Session.

Where was Rahul Gandhi when all this was happening?

The ordinance cleared by the Union Cabinet meeting chaired by Manmohan Singh, which Sonia Gandhi was also a part of, is nothing but yet another attempt of political brazenness to subvert the guiding principles of democracy by planting the provisions of the RP Act Amendment Bill ‘immediately’, that would otherwise be in place by December, to save some big political names from immediate disqualification.

….everybody does this….but would Rahul Gandhi stop this nonsense, the RP Act Amendment Bill that, in essence, is the inspiration behind this silly ordinance, in the Winter Session of Parliament?

We need to wait till then before making any opinion.

Because, Rahul Gandhi says the political parties should stop making small compromises!

But what about big compromises?

Should the political outfits continue singing the ‘compromise’ (say the coalition ‘Dharma’) tune when it comes to some big compromise like the crucial number games of forming the government even if it means taking support of some historysheeter member of Parliament or someone like Suresh Kalmadi.

What is this small or big segregation?

Does it mean ‘not shielding the convicted politicians by not manipulating the lawmaking authority given by the Constitution’ is a small compromise while subverting every administrative, legal and moral norm to save someone like Robert Vadra, whose only connect to the fame is that he is son-in-law of the Nehru-Gandhi Family, is a big compromise and so is to go for?

Ethics cannot be compartmentalized as ‘small’ or ‘big’.

Rahul’s sudden outburst, that many would have thought be a masterstroke of positioning him again as an outsider, as the politician with a difference (that he sounded so when he had begun), falls flat by the record of his active years in politics.

There are plenty of other reasons to reason why taking Rahul Gandhi’s voice of conscience as ‘a genuine voice of concern of an outsider politician’ needs much more than this ‘public’ outburst of his anger?

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

TENS OF THOUSANDS ARRIVED TO WELCOME HIM OUT OF JAIL: WHY DEMOCRACY IN INDIA IS IN IMMINENT DANGER OF DISINTEGRATION?

September 2013

Thousands gathered outside the jail to greet him.

Tens of thousands arrived in Hyderabad to welcome him, to join the procession to his journey back to home, from the Chanchalguda prison to his palatial house in Hyderabad’s posh locality, Banjara Hills.

As if, a freedom fighter fighting some colonial oppression or an activist resisting a authoritarian government was coming out of jail. But sadly it wasn’t the case.

And that is acidic for the democratic health of the country. This celebration was, once again, representative of a deteriorating mindset of the masses. Yes, it is a deteriorating mindset that owes its sustenance to the continued political manipulation of the masses.

It is acidic because the person was detained in jail against charges of corruption. In a short time, he has amassed huge wealth. In his area of influence, he is seen as a strongman. We fail to trace his political history beyond his political lineage. Apart from amassing disproportionate assets, he has not done anything to be known as a great politician, a humane politician, in making. Yet, he has emerged as a big political alternative, in course of three years only.

That is certainly not good for the democratic spirit of the nation because the malaise here represents the larger malaise in the society where people fail to understand what is right or wrong and how corruption is eating the concept of the ‘Republic of India’; where people fail to put politicians facing serious allegations out of the office till such politicians prove their innocence.

The person in question was in jail for the last 16 months on many counts of violations in Disproportional Assets (DA) case. The ‘symbolically central’ Central Bureau of Investigation has filed 10 charge-sheets against him in the DA case.

Son of a popular politician, who was also a former chief-minister, the fellow is a powerful politician, running a diversified business empire. His jail-term is supposed to correlate with his assets, that are, by most analyses, disproportionate in nature.

It was alleged and widely reported that when the powerful politician father of this powerful politician son had died in an unfortunate helicopter crash in 2009, fake reports of several people dying of shock of the untimely demise of the great leader were propped to gain mileage of political sympathy. Silly!

As a natural corollary to the dynasty politics in India, nurtured and propagated by the most powerful Delhi-based political family of India, this powerful politician son demanded to succeed his father’s chief-ministerial chair, a chair that was denied to him.

Miffed with the denial of the royal chair of the chief-minster ship, he broke away from the grand old political party of India and formed his own political outfit. And in remarkable turn of events, in a pseudo-democracy with an alienated and ignorant electorate, he emerged as a strong political force in a short period of time, and so a political threat. That could have been a call for the opponents to move in 2011.

Threat to the establishment in office and court’s interventions were motives enough for the shambolic CBI to act differently from its character. Subsequently, resultantly, this powerful politician was forced behind bars and left there languishing for 16 months.

But, he kept on growing politically stronger and became even more relevant for the political equations in the changed circumstances after the Union government announced bifurcation of Andhra Pradesh. Maintaining a strong anti-Telangana stand and riding on a strong support base in the Seemandhra region could have changed the thinking of the grand old party of India that is facing an imminent danger of being wiped out in Andhra Pradesh after the bifurcation decision taken by the Congress led Union Government.

The political cliché that there are no friends or foes in politics shows us this ugly face of Indian politics, that, with a largely ignorant electorate, is eroding the democratic health of the country; is polluting whatever that is left in the name of democracy in India.

Whatever be the reality of the reported deals, between his political outfit YSRCP and the Congress, or of the BJP’s feelers to him criticising the CBI for his plight, we are going to witness some uglier political deal-making in the days to come.

No denial to this fact that Mr. Jagan Mohan Reddy, son of the former Andhra Pradesh chief minster Y S Rajashekara Reddy, has amassed wealth beyond his known sources of income.

The detention for 16 months of a son of a powerful politician with a regional clout tells us of the veracity of allegations. Had it been the case of some common man, who could even be one of Mr. Reddy’s die-hard supporters, like those swarming outside the Chanchalguda jail or on Hyderabad roads leading to the Jagan’s house, we could have believed a detention of 16 months was possible even if all the charges were false. Running a strong media empire and sitting on huge assets, Mr. Reddy had access to the resources, to finest of the legal minds in the country.

What becomes finally of Mr. Reddy in courts in his corruption cases will take a long time. It could go even beyond his lifetime. And meanwhile, he will keep enjoying his political kingdom with loyal supporters in the world’s largest democracy.

And Mr. Reddy is not alone. He is just one among the countless of the politicians facing serious corruption allegations. And he is just one among this lot of the countless that continues to enjoy to public support in spite of serious corruption allegations. Making people with serious corruption allegations politically stronger is also corruption and we are making so many of the breed stronger with every election.

That is detrimental to the democratic concept of India envisioned in its Constitution.

It reflects again and again in celebrations like these.

*“Why democracy in India is in imminent danger of disintegration?’ is a regular column on my blogging platforms to take a periodic look (say a weekly or a fortnightly or a monthly round-up of events depending on the factors in play) on political developments that are dangerous to the democratic health of the country and contribute to the process of social disintegration of the nation..”
https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/2013/09/03/why-democracy-in-india-is-in-imminent-danger-of-disintegration/

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

WHY IT IS REFRESHING TO SEE DURGA SHAKTI BECOMING A RALLYING POINT AGAINST THE POLITICAL HIGH HANDEDNESS

It is refreshing to see someone like her becoming a rallying point against the political high handedness and the incumbent corruption.

What lies beneath cannot be said but what is evident from the goings at the moment is she is an honest and dynamic Indian Administrative Service officer who is being hounded by the political ego and elements of corruption in Indian politics.

It is encouraging to see the symbolism reflecting in her victimization and the subsequent media and political uproar because it is not what the activism norms in India elicit.

In fact, it is still premature to term it as activism.

But it is good to see an anti-corruption symbolism in her for the reasons that push us to think that we need to raise voice for her; that we need to raise voice against the wrong; that we need to protest.

Any such symbolism, any such issue is a desperate need in India of the day – a democracy reeling under increasing political apathy and chronic corruption.

Dots are just small points of reference but they add up to form a line and so the larger frame of reference to mobilize support over an issue. Her case represents one such dot that could be a reference point in fight against corruption owing to its uniquely placed thematic elements:

She is a not a corrupt bureaucrat: Indian bureaucrats are notorious for their elitism, social alienation, corruption and insensitivity. So, someone from this class standing against the norms of bureaucratic corruption and norms of bureaucratic machinery in India is refreshing.

She is a young bureaucrat: Though there are no set benchmarks on which age-group people are more corrupt, it is the common and the right observation that youngsters are relatively purer and so better than the middle-aged and the elderly in reacting honestly on the wrongs in the society. Only an honest reaction on something wrong can motivate to act further to have a corrective action.

Certainly, Durga Shakti’s act is thought-provoking for many youngsters including her young colleagues in the bureaucracy.

It is foolhardy to think that her case is going to change how the bureaucracy and the polity function in India but it also tells us the younger and the purer thought in an otherwise rotten Indian bureaucracy is not fully dead yet.

She has stood her ground in the worst bad land of Indian politics: Anyone who knows the functioning of India’s bureaucracy and polity understands that she would be under immense pressure to toe the government line, even at the cost of becoming scapegoat to satisfy political ego and political corruption. But she has stood firm and that too in the badlands of Uttar Pradesh, a graveyard for issue-based politics. That is certainly encouraging.

Whatever happens to the outcome, but it certainly tells the spark is there. Let’s see when the fire is lit. Let’s work to light the fire.

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

VICTIMIZATION OF DURGA SHAKTI NAGPAL: NOT EVEN A CONSOLIDATED VOICE AGAINST THE INJUSTICE BY THE IAS LOBBY!

The war cry that should have been heard by now – loud and clear!

Though it is true the thousands and thousands of IAS and IPS officers are spread across the length and breadth of India and so lack a coherent structure of unity but it is equally true that they come from a same source and are trained in same schools and such issues should be clarion call to raise the voice for the cause.

Feeling for the fraternity, camaraderie or simply the professional lineage to belong to place!

But! Alas!

The honest IAS and IPS officers and whistleblowers are either victimized or killed and the bureaucracy and the polity play silly politics on how to protect the ‘honest’ breed.

How deep is the rot is evident from this incident where a young IAS (Indian Administrative Services) officer Durga Shakti Nagpal was allegedly, wrongfully shunted and suspended on behest of the sand-mining mafia of the notorious criminal belt of western Uttar Pradesh (including a politician from the ruling party in Uttar Pradesh)?

But no one from these two stakeholders (bureaucracy + polity) looks in mood to protect the remaining vestiges of honesty in bureaucracy. (There is no need to write on honesty in Indian politics. It was killed long ago.)

In fact, the lobby of IAS and IPS (Indian Police Services) officers is so strong that if it decides to raise an issue, politicians would have to think hundred times before taking an obstinate posture like Akhilesh Yadav and his party have taken in Durga Shakti’s case.

It is rightly said that bureaucrats run (and so manipulate) the system and so the country. Instead, their stronghold on the system is increasing with increasing criminalization of Indian politics where more and more half-baked and quality-illiterate politicians are easily finding chairs in the highest seats of policymaking.

But expecting a war cry (and indeed, by now, the nation should have heard the war cry by the lobby of bureaucrats) on victimization of an honest IAS officer from the fellow bureaucrats is like expecting from the Bhupinder Singh Hooda’s Haryana government that it would reopen the dubious land-deal cases of Robert Vadra.

How can we expect this from the class of bureaucrats who, no matter how poor they were born, die filthy rich; who amass millions and millions of disproportionate wealth; who rush to touch feet of politicians to be in their good book; who brazenly allow and cover-up the wrongs of the political goons; who seldom visit the hinterlands but frame policies deciding fate of millions cursed to live in those parts; who plot to siphon-off the public money by being complicit in the chronic political corruption eroding whatever little left in the name of the democratic weaving of the country.

Don’t expect that some miracle is going to happen. Some senior, obedient and ‘reverent’ bureaucrat of Uttar Pradesh would advise the state government to exploit the system to put the brave lady in the dock. It can be safely said politicians of Uttar Pradesh do not have that much of intellectual capital to implicate her falsely until they get advice from some seasoned bureaucrat.

And while writing this, the reports say the lady IAS officer has been served the chargesheet by the state government.

Indian bureaucracy is infamous across the world and is seen as among the worst performing bureaucracies. A study last year by the Hong Kong based Political & Economic Risk Consultancy Limited rated Indian bureaucracy as the worst in Asia. Corruption figured as a major factor responsible for its inefficiency.

Findings of yet another study done jointly by the Department of Economics and Business, Aarhus University and the Department of Economics, Iowa State University, say ‘Indian bureaucracy attracts more corrupt people than the private sector’.

It is no surprise then that we haven’t yet heard even a consolidated voice from the bureaucrats on this injustice being done to one of their colleagues, a young, brave and honest IAS officer.

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/