14 CRORE INDIANS IN HIGHER EDUCATION AGE-GROUP AND A SYSTEM THAT IS FAILING THEM

18-23 year bracket is considered the higher education age-group and according to the data available from the Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD), India has around 14 crore youth (14,10,46,000 to be precise) who should populate our institutes of higher learning.

But only 24 per cent of them, i.e., 3,42,11,000 are enrolled in higher education courses, means over 10 crore youth of the country in an age-group that is considered academically most fertile, are missing from the scene.

And when we further split this 3.42 crore figure, we come across some more disturbing facts that tell why India’s higher education is in shambles and why it lags in every major global ranking.

Research based course like Ph.D. and M.Phil. have just over 1.5 lakh (1,51,000) students enrolled the ministry data shows. That is just 0.1 per cent of the total higher education population in our country. And even their quality is questionable with corruption, political appointments and nepotism ruining the standard of teaching in almost every institution.

Apart from few institution, we simply do not have the research culture in our universities. We can gauge the seriousness of the situation by the fact that for quality research education, it has become a common observation that one needs to look beyond India.

Number of students in post-graduate courses in the country is 38,53,000, a little under 3 per cent (at 2.73 per cent) of the 18-23 age-group population. Only cream of them go for further higher education like carrier oriented research education or get into post-graduate professional courses like management, medicine and higher engineering and technology courses. Most of them had no other option but to look for jobs – jobs that are really not there – or jobs that have dried up.

And maximum of them are enrolled in under-graduate courses, 2,71,72,000 of them or around 20 per cent of the country’s higher education population or 80 per cent of all students enrolled in higher education.

Now irrespective of the fact that how many of them go on to complete their under-graduate, post-graduate, M.Phil. and Ph.D. courses, something that is subject for a separate discourse, the huge difference between every successive level of higher education shows higher education in our country virtually stops at the graduation level.

Only 38.5 lakh graduate students (around 14 per cent) out of 2.71 crore students enrolled in under-graduate courses opt for a post-graduate course, and only a handful of post-graduates (around 4 per cent) go for further higher education or research.

©SantoshChaubey

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JOBLESS PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION?

India has around 10,000 engineering colleges and 5500 management institutes producing each year over 16 lakh engineers and over 5 lakh management graduates, data from All India Council of Technical Education (AICTE) and ASSOCHAM say.

And most of them are unemployable.

While AICTE says some 60-70 per cent of engineers remain unemployed, an ASSOCHAM study has found that only 7 per cent of our management graduates are employable.

Other reports by organizations like FICCI, EY and Aspire Minds quote even higher proportion of unemployable engineering graduates in the country, at 80 per cent. Studies also say that B and C category business schools are producing basically unemployable graduates and if some of them find jobs, it is mostly in the range of 8000-10,000.

They are in oversupply.

Estimates put 1-1.5 million Indians entering job market every month but the country could create only 1.55 lakh jobs in 2015 and 2.31 lakh in 2016. The situation is acute in case of professional education courses like engineering and management where students pay much higher but end up either jobless or with abysmally low paying sub-standard jobs.

If industry needs few lakhs of engineers every year, the proportion of management graduates is even less – at around 40,000 as some estimates put it.

So, basically there are no jobs for most of them, especially when job creation in the country is at eight years low.

And it is not that all the jobs created are going to them only. Others, from non-professional course, are competing for those illusive jobs as well. The Census of India 2011 put number of graduates and above at 6.8 crore.

Six years have passed since then and so the number would certainly have gone up. Many of them would in some job. Many of them would be some sort of entrepreneurs. But most of them would be either jobless or forced to earn their livelihood by trying their luck in the unorganized sector.

©SantoshChaubey

CHRONIC SHORTAGE OF FACULTY POSITIONS IN IITS

India’s higher education is facing chronic shortage of manpower, be it the regular university education or the professional education. And when it comes to professional education, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) and Indian Institute of Management (IIM) stand India apart in the world.

But our IITs are going through a rough phase, especially when it comes to the availability of trainers to train future engineers, scientists and tech professionals.

According to a written Lok Sabha reply by Minister of State for Human Resource Development in December last year, the sanctioned faculty strength for the IITs is 5,073. More than half of it, 2,671, are lying vacant.

According to an RTI reply obtained by a newspaper in November 2015, six of the eight old IITs (including IIT-BHU and IIT Dhanbad) are facing teaching manpower shortage, ranging from 33% in IIT Delhi to 53% in IIT BHU.

38.66% – IIT BOMBAY
42.42% – IIT KHARAGPUR
41.88% – IIT ROORKEE
33.11% – IIT DELHI
26.50% – IIT GUWAHATI
53.39% – IIT-BHU

The situation of new IITs is no better, given the fact that most of these institutes have been established in the last decade, starting from 2008 and so they should have less faculty requirement during their initial formative years.

56.67% – IIT-JODHPUR
21.11% – IIT PATNA
14.44% – IIT INDORE
20% – IIT HYDERABAD
10.18% – IIT HYDERABAD

Six IITs, IIT Bhubaneswar, IIT Patna, IIT Gandhinagar, IIT Jodhpur, IIT Hyderabad and IIT Ropar were established in 2008. 2009 saw IIT Mandi and IIT indore coming into existence.

Six more IITs are upcoming. IIT Palakkad and IIT Tirupati were given go ahead in 2015 while IIT Bhilai, IIT Dharwad, IIT Goa and IIT Jammu in 2016. That makes for 23 IITs in India. When the already existing IITs, the old and new are facing huge manpower shortage, what will happen with the upcoming one. And what will happen to the quality of talent coming out of these otherwise quality institutions.

©SantoshChaubey

INDIA’S EDUCATION MARKET – SCHOOL EDUCATION (I)

IndiaEducationMarket1

INDIA’S EDUCATION MARKET
SCHOOL EDUCATION

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

INDIA’S EDUCATION MARKET – AT $100 BILLION AND GROWING!

IndiaEducationMarket1

INDIA’S EDUCATION MARKET
AT $100 BILLION AND GROWING!

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

WHY DID WE FAIL TO TRAVEL FROM HYDERABAD TO VILLUPURAM? (II)

This time it was another research scholar and another central university. And he was not Dalit.

A research scholar from the Central University of Rajasthan committed suicide because, allegedly, he was under depression by pressure and harassment from his research advisor.

These are allegations – allegations that forced the nation to take note when Rohith Vemula committed suicide – because there were inbuilt elements of Dalit politics – and because, rightly there were elements of caste discrimination.

We have discussed why the Rohith’s case took the nation by storm and why the Villupuram case failed to do so.

Politics dear folks! Politics!

Stay assure that nothing is going to happen in this Central University of Rajasthan case – as nothing concrete in fact happened in Rohith Vemula’s case – in spite of media outrage and the subsequent national grief. No one, including anyone from the University of Hyderabad, has been held responsible in the case.

Suicide by three students of the SVS College of Naturopathy and Yoga in Tamil Nadu’s Villupuam (or spate of student suicides that were reported after Rohith Vemula incident or even this one from the Central University of Rajasthan) is sans scopes of political mileage and so we are not going to hear much about them.

Yes, it was about three girl students, who were Dalit, and they allegedly committed suicide because they were left in a hopeless state – and it happened within a week of Rohith Vemula incident (January 17 to January 23) – so it did get due media exposure. But politicians were not there. Likewise, there will be no outrage or scrutiny of this incident at the Central University of Rajasthan. If it has to get, it will get just routine coverage.

Because these incidents happen in one of those educational institution which are established to dupe and loot incidents. The quality of students (or professionals) who pass out from these outfits is poor. And most of the time, some politicians are found behind the projects – either directly or in patronizing positions.

These institutions are either in small towns or in peripheries of bigger, metro cities (in a clutter of clusters – with no differentiation) – busy in deceiving dreams.

So no one likes to talk about them, including media and society, even if it directly affects many families, sucking up their earnings of whole life – circumstances that force sincere students to the extremes of hopelessness.

Educational institutions in India are run with dictatorial mindset. Government run institutions including central and state universities and most professional colleges are fiefdoms of their administrative heads, teachers and officers. And almost private academic institution are like mercenary banks who operate on ‘no return’ policy.

The first that they do is – they kill the culture of healthy dissent – and in the process sacrifice universal values of humanity.

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

WHY DID WE FAIL TO TRAVEL FROM HYDERABAD TO VILLUPURAM? (I)

Rohith Vemula’s suicide took the nation by storm. A wave of outrage that began on January 17 when the news of his suicide broke along with his intellectually worded suicide note. Since then, the social media and the mainstream media have been all about the issue, giving due exposure any such story deserves.

And then, there were elements in place.

It was a prestigious central university – University of Hyderabad.

A Dalit research scholar had committed suicide in an educational institution where other eight Dalit students, alleging caste discrimination, had committed suicide in the past decade.

Rohith’s letters blamed his university and social institutions.

Then there were letters by a union minister from BJP and from a central government ministry, Human Resources Development, led by Smriti Irani, in the case pressurizing the university administration to take action against Rohith Vemula and some other students for their alleged assault on an Akhil Bhartiya Vidyarthi Parishad leader (ABVP).

So, there was this angle of student politics – touching the chords of national politics – in a metro city that is one of India’s Information-Technology capitals.

And above all, there was this angle of Dalit Vs non-Dalit angle.

So, even if was a horror, that a young student was forced to commit suicide due to administrative apathy, social disparity and political interference, all elements were in place for every stakeholder, including politicians, to squeeze the mileage that would suit them.

Yes, apart from social media and media outrage, and the subsequent social mobilization, it is pure politics.

And why it is pure politics becomes clear from yet another social horror.

Three students of an allied medial college in Villupuram, a Tamil Nadu district, committed suicide by jumping in a well because they had lost all hopes for their future as the college that had promised them a rosy future had duped them of their families’ savings. They alleged in their suicide note that the college administration had imparted no skills in almost first two years of their college and there were no facilities to train them. The college was busy in looting them, and at the same time, was killing the students by denying them their option to earn livelihood.

The students wrote in their suicide note that they were committing suicide hoping that it would draw attention to their plight. Another girt student from the same college committed suicide later.
These students were Dalit as well.

Yes, we cannot and we should not compare but it was another horror after Rohith Vemula’s suicide that should have rightly driven us mad on the sorry state of affairs in the our higher educational institutions.

But it didn’t happen after the initial social media and media fury – and why?

To continue..

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

VILLUPURAM MEDICAL STUDENTS SUICIDE: SHABBY HIGHER EDUCATION KILLS SOME MORE DREAMS

Reports say three students of an Ayurveda medical college in Tamil Nadu committed suicide alleging the college administration of playing with their future. Reports say the students of the college were protesting bad infrastructure, administration’s apathy and principal’s exploitative callousness in the college.

Big promises of a bright future – like after passing out from a medical college – duplicitously selling practices like ‘Naturopathy and Yoga Sciences’ – garnishing them with glamour quotient of terms like ‘medical colleges’..

Apathetic and insensitive college administration, principal and management – exploitative to the core..

Exorbitant fee – Rs. 6,00,000 in two years – here in this case – its goes higher easily in higher education institutions of professional studies – and many sincere students who cannot secure position in good institutions – but still find education as the only alternative for their careers ahead – end up in these exploitative institutions that run like a money-making machines – killings dreams – slaying lives..

They promise skies while giving you admission but after that the sole focus shifts to collecting fees and imposing further types of fees and fines to fill coffers..

Many states in India have engineering colleges with seats running in hundreds of thousands. Their graduates cannot stand even a sound humanities graduate from a good institution. Similar is the case of management colleges. These are the two streams that have killed maximum dreams in India – thus milking the maximum money. Now many colleges are shutting their door because they are not getting students.

Medical education is relatively a safe bet for such money sharks that prowl through educational institutions. Because setting up and running a medical college requires deep investment and regular onslaught of checks and balances. Even then we regularly come across reports of poor quality and threats of affiliation withdrawal. That makes allied fields like ‘naturopathy, yoga, homeopathy, Unani and even fakes like electrohomeopathy’ a safer bet for fraudsters or for people from extended clan of education mafia.

These girls had spent almost Rs. 6 Lakh and they had not completed even the second year. And they had not learnt anything. And their repeated pleas have fallen on deaf ears. And Rs. 6 Lakh is a lot for many families in India to arrange – cut or tighten your budget or borrow – and when you see happening things like this, your impulse can drive you to take any decision in those desperate moments of despair.

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/