FROM KARGIL TO 2010 KASHMIR UNREST TO PRESENT: INDIA’S PAKISTAN NARRATIVE GETS SOME MUCH NEEDED CHANGE

It has been a much needed change in India’s diplomatic manoeuvres. The world’s largest democracy has finally broken the shackles of misplaced notions to emerge as a powerful voice in geopolitics.

And this change, if has surprised an arrogant and power blind China for its resilience, has completely decimated Pakistani propaganda in international circles, especially at multilateral platforms like the United Nations or the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa).

Pakistan has, for its own peril, made an anti-India stand its lifeline and has been trying to destabilize India ever since it came into existence in 1947 and what has been ironical that its propaganda even succeeded in outperforming India when it came to diplomacy and PR.

India was never outspoken in promoting its viewpoint and always lacked a sense of communication finesse to counter the Pakistani propaganda. If we go through the speeches delivered by India at the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) on occasions like the Kargil War or 2010 Kashmir unrest or the situation in Kashmir now, we can see this change.

To continue..

©SantoshChaubey

PAKISTAN AND TERROR: WHAT MODI GOVERNMENT’S UNGA SPEECHES TELL US SO FAR

The article originally appeared on India Today.

The four speeches that the Narendra Modi government has delivered from the podium of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) clearly tell where it began on Pakistan and where it stands now.

The first one, in September 2014, was addressed to the UNGA by Narendra Modi while External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj delivered the other three, including the latest one on September 23, 2017.

And when we go through them for the Pakistan specific portions, we can clearly see a trend – that how India first gave its rogue neighbour a chance to mend its ways and stop sponsoring terror into India – and then how it was compelled to take a tough, non-compromising position after seeing that Pakistan was beyond redemption.

After his government’s inaugural in May 2014 where Narendra Modi had invited Pakistani prime minister Nawaz Sharif along with other SAARC leaders, he did try and gave Pakistan several chances until January 2016 when terrorists who had come Pakistan attacked Indian Air Force base at Pathankot in Punjab.

Though India had cancelled secretary level talks in August 2014 over Pakistan’s stubborn attitude to include Kashmiri separatists in bilateral talks, India really never closed the doors until Pathankot happened.

Modi and Sharif met in November 2014 in Kathmandu during the SAARC Summit, then on the sidelines of the SCO Summit in Ufa in July 2015, in Paris in November 2015 on the sidelines of the Climate Change Conference and in December 2015 when, in an unprecedented friendly gesture, Narendra Modi took a detour while en route to Delhi from Kabul and landed in Lahore to meet and greet Nawaz Sharif on his birthday on December 25.

And the language of Modi’s UNGA speech on September 27, 2014 reflects that. The speech that mentioned Pakistan four times and terror 18 times said that “Modi was prepared to engage in a serious bilateral dialogue with Pakistan in a peaceful atmosphere, without the shadow of terrorism, to promote friendship and cooperation” adding that, “however, Pakistan must also take its responsibility seriously to create an appropriate atmosphere for bilateral dialogue.”

India’s 2015 speech at the UNGA though put Pakistan directly in the dock for sheltering terrorists and spoke forcefully of Pakistan’s illegal occupation of Kashmir, it didn’t mention Pakistan more than three times in hopes that sense could still prevail in the mindset of the Pakistani ruling elite. Addressed by Sushma Swaraj on October 1, 2015, the speech said that “India remained open to dialogue but talks and terror could not go together.”

She added in speech where she mentioned terror 19 times, “Let us hold talks at the level of NSAs on all issues connected to terrorism and an early meeting of our Directors General of Military Operations to address the situation on the border. If the response is serious and credible, India is prepared to address all outstanding issues through a bilateral dialogue.”

But Pakistan had other evil intentions. So, in spite of Narendra Modi’s courageous step to heal India Pakistan ties, it backstabbed India just after a week, when terrorists, suspected to be from the United Jihad Council and Jaish-e-Mohammed, Pakistan based terror groups, attacked Pathankot Air Force base on January 2, 2016.

It has been a downward curve in India Pakistan ties since then with relations coming to a freeze. Pakistan’s nefarious designs did the same with the Pathankot attack probe like it has done with 2008 Mumbai terror attacks probe – absolutely nothing. Instead, it instigated a new wave of unrest in Kashmir by declaring the terrorist Burhan Wani a martyr and financially and military supporting separatists and terrorists.

The 2016 UNGA speech by Sushma Swaraj on September 26, 2016 that mentioned Pakistan six times bore the signs of frustration and the subsequent realization. The speech summed up India’s efforts to reach out to Pakistan, like Modi’s gestures, and how Pakistan backstabbed – “And what did we get in return? Pathankot, Bahadur Ali, and Uri.”

The speech that also mentioned terror 18 times then warned Pakistan in no unclear terms, “My firm advice to Pakistan is: abandon this dream. Let me state unequivocally that Jammu and Kashmir is an integral part of India and will always remain so.”

And 2017 only builds on that realization. Sushma’s address to the UNGA on September 23 in New York mentioned Pakistan 16 times and terror 20 times and said that “Pakistan seemed only engaged in fighting India.” Sushma speech that spent 655 words on explaining Pakistan’s double-dealings and treachery held Pakistan responsible for the aborting the peace process between the two countries.

Clearly making a distinction between the two countries and showing Pakistan its real place Sushma said Pakistan had become a hopeless case and it had nothing to offer to the world and indeed to its own people apart from terrorism.

©SantoshChaubey

THANKFULLY, NARENDRA MODI DOESN’T NEED TO MEET ARMY CHIEF BEFORE NSA LEVEL TALKS

It can be a normal report on a routine political development in Pakistan but thankfully, we, in India, don’t come across such ‘displays’.

Army chief of Pakistan, Raheel Sharif, met Pakistan’s prime minister Nawaz Sharif today to discuss the upcoming dialogue between the National Security Advisers of India and Pakistan. Chief of Inter Services Intelligence (ISI), Pakistan’s notorious spy agency, was also there.

Obviously, the public façade of such meetings are always conveyed as something else, like this was a routine security meeting between the prime minister and the army chief. But on agenda was the upcoming NSA level meet in Delhi and as ceasefire violations have continued in spite of Nawaz Sharif’s words, we can easily guess what would have transpired in the meeting.

No such meeting happened in India. No such meeting for the ‘meeting’ of NSAs is going to happen in India. 

Narendra Modi doesn’t need to call Indian Army chief to prepare for Ajit Doval – Sartaz Aziz meet in New Delhi on August 23-24.

Indian political establishment is free from such interference. That is the strength of our functional democracy.

And that is just one among many pointers that tell why we are a flourishing democracy and why Pakistan is still a limping military state – a country where democracy has always been dependent on its army to draw sanctity – a country where military has been in the government most of the time.

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

AND THE NOBEL PEACE PRIZE 2013 GOES TO MANMOHAN SINGH

FOR HIS PEACE INITIATIVE WITH PAKISTAN

Friday, October 11, 2013: In a development that has shocked the world community including many in India but has pleasantly stunned Mr. Manmohan Singh, Mr. Thorbjørn Jagland, Chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, has announced the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize goes to the career bureaucrat, who also happens to be India’s Prime Minister, Dr. Manmohan Singh.

The prime minster’s office at the 7RCR in Delhi has opened multiple lines of communication to receive the greeting calls from the ordinary citizens in a bid to cash the announcement for the electoral mileage at an electorally tough time for the Congress party, the largest party of the ruling coalition, the United Progressive Alliance. But it’s been hours and the response has been muted like the muted reaction of the political opponents of the UPA and the Congress party.

While Manmohan Singh was elated beyond words and asked us to wait for his worded response, the Congress party said it was a testimony to what the UPA government has been doing for India.

Excerpts from the Norwegian Nobel Committee press-release read:

The Norwegian Nobel Committee has decided that the Nobel Peace Prize for 2013 is to be awarded to Dr. Manmohan Singh, the prime minister of India, the world’s largest democracy. If a democracy like India is somehow functional, it is due to the hard-work of the likes of Dr. Singh. India is a rapidly developing global superpower due to its large market size and impressive growth rate over the last two decade barring the last few years. With changing times, it becomes imperative for the country, an emerging superpower, to play a major role in the global peace-keeping process and what could be the better beginning than establishing peace at the controversial India-Pakistan border.

Dr. Singh, for the past 10 years, has been relentlessly working to maintain peace in one of the world’s most hostile region, Jammu & Kashmir, the South Asian patch of land claimed and shared by both the neighbouring countries, India and Pakistan.

In announcing this Peace Prize to Dr. Singh, the Norwegian Nobel Committee is driven by the similar intent and sentiments that it had while announcing the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize to Mr. Barack Obama, the serving US President and one of the great motivators of the Indian prime minister.

The decision to award the Peace Prize to Mr. Obama was based not on his achievements but on the ‘promising hopes’ he had raised with his journey to become the elected President of the USA, an inspiring journey then, with his ‘yes, we can’ promise.

Dr. Singh also raises hopes that the process of building peace in one of the world’s most hostile regions that can have serious implication for the global stability, Jammu & Kashmir, continues, even if it means drawing intense criticism back home. In fact, Dr. Singh’s achievements become even more credible when we see what compromises he had to make to continue with his peace-initiative with Pakistan.

He had to tolerate the bullying of Pakistan. His country is still being victimized by the continued acts of state-sponsored terrorism by Pakistan in many parts of India including Jammu & Kashmir. Had it been with any other leader, we could never have thought of the India-Pakistan peace process coming back to the dialogue table so early and that too, with the continued backstabbing acts of Pakistan, as Dr. Singh did during the United Nations General Assembly session last month. On this count, Dr. Singh outdoes even his motivator, Mr. Obama. Recently, Mr. Obama cancelled summit talk with Mr. Vladimir Putin, the President of Russia, after Russia gave asylum to Mr. Edward Snowden, whom the US alleges of compromising the national security by leaking classified information.

Also, Dr. Singh had to face intense criticism in his country when he decided to resume summit dialogue with his Pakistani counterpart. It was in addition to the problems he was facing on internal political front owing to the multiple corruption allegations against his government and a slowing economy. That could have easily weakened anyone’s resolve to bow to the domestic pressure in the country to not withdraw from any dialogue with Pakistan at this stage.

But, Dr. Singh showed he was a man of intent. In spite of criticisms and allegations, he went ahead and held the meeting with his Pakistani counterpart, Mr. Nawaz Sharif, on the sidelines of the UNGA.

Like his domestic problems, nothing promising can be said about the India-Pakistan peace initiative spearheaded single-handedly by Dr. Singh but as mentioned earlier, the decision by the Norwegian Nobel Committee has been taken keeping in view the prospects of the peace-initiative and not its outcome. Peace between India and Pakistan, and its economic returns, would inspire other South Asian countries and hence the world to weigh their options and policies again. If South Asia could become a peace haven, it would be a boon for the world. Hosting three hugely populous countries with around 1500 million of population, the region could become a hue market, an economic powerhouse for the world, bringing prosperity to the world in a globalized economy.

For 112 years, the Norwegian Nobel Committee has sought to promote a global environment of peace and prosperity and the Committee endorses Dr. Singh’s efforts to contribute to this never-ending process.

Oslo, October 11, 2013

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/