INDIA HAS A SEPARATE COMMUNICATIONS MINISTRY NOW..AND WITH IT SOME PERTINENT QUESTIONS?

The much talked about second cabinet reshuffle and expansion of the Narendra Modi government is over. And it has thrown some very curious talking points.

One of them is about the introduction of an interesting innovation – a separate Ministry of Communications.

The routine practice so far has been about clubbing together these two elements of the communication ecology – telecommunication and information-technology – in a single ministry. Manmohan Singh had his Communications & Information-Technology minister in the government that was followed by Narendra Modi who appointed Ravi Shankar Prasad as the Communications & Information Technology minister when he formed the government in May 2014.

That is not the case anymore.

Manoj Sinha who was a junior Railways Minister so far has been promoted as the Minister of State (Independent Charge), Communications in addition to his old portfolio, ie., MoS (Railways).

Ravi Shankar Prasad, who was the Communications & Information Technology minister so far, is now Electronics & Information Technology minister along with the additional charge of the Ministry of Law & Justice.

And before the July 5 reshuffle, the economically vital sectors of any country in the modern times – telecommunication and information-technology – fell under his purview.

Now that there is a separate Ministry of Communications – the pressing question is – what this ministry would look after?

As telecommunication has been removed from the ambit of the Electronics & Information Technology ministry and put under the Communications ministry, we come across some pertinent questions.

A Google search on the definition of Communications says – “means of sending or receiving information, such as telephone lines or computers”.

Furthermore, the Wikipedia writes about the Information & Communications Technologies (ICT) as – “Information and communications technology (ICT) is an extended term for information technology (IT) which stresses the role of unified communications and the integration of telecommunications (telephone lines and wireless signals), computers as well as necessary enterprise software, middleware, storage, and audio-visual systems, which enable users to access, store, transmit, and manipulate information”.

It means the Communications ministry should cover the telecommunication sector as well as the computing technologies, i.e., internet (means of sending or receiving information). At least that should be the case – going by the available definitions in the related literature.

But then what Mr. Ravi Shankar Prasad would do with his Electronics & Information Technology ministry?

Google search about the term information technology returns with the following definition – “the study or use of systems (especially computers and telecommunications) for storing, retrieving, and sending information.”

While it defines ‘electronics’ as – “the branch of physics and technology concerned with the design of circuits using transistors and microchips, and with the behaviour and movement of electrons in a semiconductor, conductor, vacuum, or gas”.

In simple terms, the Ministry of Electronics & Information Technology also concerns with the telecommunication sector and the computing technologies. It would create problems if the roles are not properly demarcated and defined then.

Also, the Government of India web directory page on the Ministry of Communications & Information Technology shows that the Department of Electronics & Information Technology (DeitY), Department of Telecommunications (DoT) and the Department of Posts together form the Ministry.

MoC&IT-GOIWD

So, there is a clear case of overlapping in the functional areas of the now separated Communications ministry and the Information Technology ministry. And this functional overlapping has been the reason, so far, behind clubbing all the communication technologies together in a ministry.

In a communications ecology increasingly dominated by smartphones along with the growing penetration of information technology in everyday life – something that is again driven by telecom revolution in India – DeitY and DoT must coordinate and act together to ensure an efficient monitoring environment. Also, we need to keep in mind here that almost all the major telecom firms are also big internet service providers.

How would they feel if they are regulated by two separate ministries now – as DoT is now under the Ministry of Communications while DeitY remains under the Ministry of Electronics & Information Technology?

In other words, there would be two ministries to approach now – one ministry for the telecommunication related practices – and the other ministry for data issues – and the related baggage of dealing with two functional heads and the trail of manpower that follows them. It can simply turn out to be a too difficult to handle.

And where would the Department of Post would go?

A separate Ministry of Communications sounds good but the government needs to answer these questions first. Obviously, the government would have thought on this line. Let’s see the blueprint it comes out with.

©SantoshChaubey

WHAT EXACTLY WOULD MODI SARKAR’S NEW ‘COMMUNICATIONS MINISTRY’ DO?

The article originally appeared on DailyO.

The much talked about second Cabinet reshuffle and expansion of the Narendra Modi government is over. And it has thrown around some rather curious talking points.

One of them is about the introduction of an interesting innovation: the ministry of communications.

The routine practise so far has been about clubbing together these two elements of the communication ecology – telecommunication and information technology – in a single ministry.

Dr Manmohan Singh had his “communications and information technology minister” in the government that was followed by Narendra Modi who appointed Ravi Shankar Prasad as the communications and information technology minister when he formed the government in May 2014.

That is not the case anymore.

Manoj Sinha, who was a junior railways minister so far, has been promoted as the minister of state (independent charge), communications, in addition to his old portfolio, which is, MoS railways.

Ravi Shankar Prasad, who was the communications and information technology minister so far, is now the electronics and information technology minister along with the additional charge of the ministry of law and justice.

The economically vital sectors of any country in the modern times – telecommunication and information technology – fell under his purview.

Now that there is a separate ministry of communications, the pressing question is – what would this ministry look after?

Has telecom been removed from the ambit of the electronics and information technology ministry and put under the communications ministry?

Or, would this independent entity – named as the communications ministry – have some other sectors to cover? If so, what would be those sectors?

A Google search on the definition of Communications says: “means of sending or receiving information, such as telephone lines or computers”.

Furthermore, Wikipedia writes about the information and communications technologies (ICT): “Information and communications technology (ICT) is an extended term for information technology (IT) which stresses the role of unified communications and the integration of telecommunications (telephone lines and wireless signals), computers as well as necessary enterprise software, middleware, storage, and audio-visual systems, which enable users to access, store, transmit, and manipulate information.”

Now that there is a separate ministry of communications, the pressing question is – what would this ministry look after?

Has telecom been removed from the ambit of the electronics and information technology ministry and put under the communications ministry?

Or, would this independent entity – named as the communications ministry – have some other sectors to cover? If so, what would be those sectors?

A Google search on the definition of Communications says: “means of sending or receiving information, such as telephone lines or computers”.

Furthermore, Wikipedia writes about the information and communications technologies (ICT): “Information and communications technology (ICT) is an extended term for information technology (IT) which stresses the role of unified communications and the integration of telecommunications (telephone lines and wireless signals), computers as well as necessary enterprise software, middleware, storage, and audio-visual systems, which enable users to access, store, transmit, and manipulate information.”

While it defines “electronics” as “the branch of physics and technology concerned with the design of circuits using transistors and microchips, and with the behaviour and movement of electrons in a semiconductor, conductor, vacuum, or gas”.

In a simple language, the ministry of electronics and information technology also concerns with the telecommunication sector and the computing technologies. It would create problems if the roles are not properly demarcated and defined.

Also, the government of India web directory page on the ministry of communications and information technology shows that the Department of Electronics and Information Technology (DeitY), Department of Telecommunications (DoT) and the Department of Posts together form the Ministry.

MoC&IT-GOIWD

So, there is a clear case of overlapping between the functional areas of the communications ministry and the electronics and information technology ministry. And this functional overlapping has been the reason behind clubbing all the communication technologies together in a ministry.

In a communications ecology increasingly dominated by smartphones along with the growing penetration of information technology in everyday life, that is again driven by telecom revolution in India, DeitY and DoT must coordinate and act together to ensure an efficient monitoring environment. Almost all the major telecom firms are also big internet service providers.

How would they feel if they are regulated by two separate ministries now – in case DoT is given under the ministry of communications while DeitY remains under the ministry of electronics and information technology?

In simple terms, there would be two ministries to approach – one ministry for the telecommunication related practises – and the other ministry for data issues.

But if the government is not going to put DeitY and DoT under two ministries, then what else option is left there?

So, there is a clear case of overlapping between the functional areas of the communications ministry and the electronics and information technology ministry. And this functional overlapping has been the reason behind clubbing all the communication technologies together in a ministry.

In a communications ecology increasingly dominated by smartphones along with the growing penetration of information technology in everyday life, that is again driven by telecom revolution in India, DeitY and DoT must coordinate and act together to ensure an efficient monitoring environment. Almost all the major telecom firms are also big internet service providers.

How would they feel if they are regulated by two separate ministries now – in case DoT is given under the ministry of communications while DeitY remains under the ministry of electronics and information technology?

In simple terms, there would be two ministries to approach – one ministry for the telecommunication related practises – and the other ministry for data issues.

But if the government is not going to put DeitY and DoT under two ministries, then what else option is left there?

©SantoshChaubey

SO..WE HAVE AN INDEPENDENT COMMUNICATIONS MINISTRY NOW..BUT WHAT WOULD IT DO?

So, the much talked about second cabinet reshuffle and expansion of the Narendra Modi government is over.

And it has thrown some very curious talking points.

One of them is about the introduction of an interesting ministry – the Ministry of Communications.

Manoj Sinha who was a junior Railways Minister so far has been promoted as a senior minister. No he has not been made a Cabinet Minister. But he has been given the independent charge of his ministry.

He is now the Minister of State (Independent Charge), Communications.

Now what this Communications Ministry would look after – that is the million dollar question.

Ravi Shankar Prasad, a senior NDA member was the ‘Communications & Information Technology’ minister so far. The all important sectors of any country in the modern times – telecom and information-technology – fell under his purview.

Now, after the reshuffle/expansion, Mr. Prasad is the ‘Electronics & Information Technology’ minister – with additional charge of ‘Law & Justice’.

So, what will these two ministries do – ‘Communications’ and ‘Electronics & Information Technology’?

Has telecom been removed from the ambit of the ‘Electronics & Information Technology’ ministry and put under the ‘Communications’ ministry?

Or this independent entity named as the ‘Communications’ ministry would have some other sectors to cover?

A Google search on the definition of ‘Communications’ says – “means of sending or receiving information, such as telephone lines or computers”.

Furthermore, the Wikipedia writes about the Information & Communications Technologies (ICT) as – “Information and communications technology (ICT) is an extended term for information technology (IT) which stresses the role of unified communications and the integration of telecommunications (telephone lines and wireless signals), computers as well as necessary enterprise software, middleware, storage, and audio-visual systems, which enable users to access, store, transmit, and manipulate information”.

It means the ‘Communications’ ministry should cover telecom as well as computing technologies, i.e., internet (means of sending or receiving information). At least that should be the case – going by the available definition in the related literature.

But then what Mr. Ravi Shankar Prasad would do with his ‘Electronics & Information Technology’ ministry?

The Google search about the term ‘information technology’ returns with the following definition – “the study or use of systems (especially computers and telecommunications) for storing, retrieving, and sending information.”

While it defines ‘electronics’ as – “the branch of physics and technology concerned with the design of circuits using transistors and microchips, and with the behaviour and movement of electrons in a semiconductor, conductor, vacuum, or gas”.

In a way, the ministry of ‘Electronics & Information Technology’ also concerns with telecom and computing technologies.

So, there is a clear case of overlapping between the functional areas of the ‘Communications’ ministry and the ‘Electronics & Information Technology’ ministry. It would create problems if the roles are not properly demarcated and defined.

Obviously, the government would have thought on this line. Let’s see the blue-print it comes out with.

©SantoshChaubey

SO, WHAT SORT OF EXPANSION WOULD IT BE TOMORROW?

Narendra Modi is going to expand his cabinet tomorrow. The names that will figure there tomorrow in the list of the oath-takers are almost certain. Though the official list is yet to come out, the probable names have become more or less clear. The Rashtrapati Bhavan has been informed and as per the reports, the ceremony will begin at 11 AM.

Why we are buying the names because of the leads that we are getting when we look at the list.

The probable names are: SS Ahluwalia, PP Chaudhary, Anupriya Patel, Vijay Goeal, MJ Akbar, Anil Madhav Dave, Mansukhbhai Mandavia, Mahendranath Pandey, Purshottam Rupala, Faggan Singh Kulaste, Krishna Raj, Jaswantsinh Bhabhor, Ramdas Athawale, Subhash Bhamre, Arjun Ram Meghwal, Ajay Tamta, Ramesh Jigajinagi.

A look at them tells they are a mix of possibilities – to tame the considerations of experience – to exploit the permutations and combinations of caste – and to send a message – that no one is secure and the game is going to be performance based.

Though the last prospect looks watered down here – because many ministers whose names were doing rounds as the possible drop-outs are not going to figure there tomorrow – as much we know – so far.

In a country like India where elections are held every year – and where elections are basically contested on factors like caste, community and regional affiliations – performance cannot be the sole criteria for judging a minister for a particular portfolio.

2017 will see five assembly polls – Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Goa, Punjab and Manipur. Of these five, the BJP will try all to win Uttar Pradesh and Uttarakhand.

Though the BJP is now the biggest political party in terms of its governments in the state assemblies, it is true that no party can claim to run the show in the country unless it has an emphatic presence in Uttar Pradesh – India’s most populous state that sends 80 MPs to the Lok Sabha (and the maximum number of Rajya Sabha MPs) – the state from where the BJP began its journey to take the political centrestage – but a state where the party has been reduced to the 3rd spot. Though the party has wasted the last two years after the absolute win of the 2014 Lok Sabha polls in the state, winning 73 out of 80 seats (with 2 seats of its ally Apna Dal), its strategists still think that it can win the state once again.

So, Uttar Pradesh will have to get a proportion in the cabinet expansion accordingly. Uttarakhand can be an upcoming battle royale after the BJP’s failed attempt to impose the President’s Rule in the state. Now winning the state has become a prestige issue.

The major transitions, transfers and omissions will be based on the equations the upcoming assembly elections in these two states – because Manipur is not that important from an electoral point of view – because Punjab is a lost chance – and because Goa, too, is going to be a negative prospects zone with rising anti-incumbency against the BJP government there.

Representation from states – representation from castes – and representation from experience sub-sets would depend on that.

©SantoshChaubey

MODI GOVT @ 2: A DAY OF STATISTICAL TALES

Today was basically a field days for spokespersons. They tried to cover as much length and breadth of this country as possible and they tried to speak as louder as they could so as to become audible (and visible) to media and social media eyes and ears and so on. What was put in action some days ago saw its top pitch today and will have its various notes in the days to come.

The biggest of them (in stature), held big sized rallies like the one held by Narendra Modi in Saharanpur.

Then there were extensions – from the ruling party – and from the opposition – selling and counter-selling achievements and allegations.

And then there were propped up or spontaneous splinter entities – on airwaves – blessing or bashing the two years of the Narendra Modi government.

Now, statistics tells what you want it to tell.

So, Narendra Modi, his spokespersons, other leaders of his party and his supporters have plenty to tell – from social empowerment – to introducing structural changes in infrastructure – to industrial turnaround – to internal and external security – to foreign policy.

Likewise, Narendra Modi and BJP’s political rivals, including Modi’s detractors, have as much in their kitty as they want to scatter – and they want to scatter it all.

So, if NDA and BJP’s ministers, MPs and other leaders are busy holding meetings and rallies in different parts of countries, hard-selling their claimed achievements in these two years – the two years, that according to them, have changed India – political rivals and opposition, including Congress, Left Front, JDU, AAP and others are busy hard-selling their counterpoints – presenting point by point rebuttal of government’s claims.

But the fact is – statistics doesn’t really tell the stories that pull votes in times of elections – if figures are without facts – or even if figures are with flimsy facts. We all saw how NDA’s ‘India Shining’ campaign crumbled in 2004. We saw how miserably the Manmohan Singh led UPA government failed in convincing people in 2014 Lok Sabha polls that it indeed had delivered on governance.

Like Modi has directed his ministers and party members to take their achievements to people, Manmohan Singh, Sonia Gandhi and Rahul Gandhi, too, had tried. The difference is – Modi is on the job right from the first year of his government while Manmohan Singh’s government tried it as a desperate campaign measure in the face of a sky-high anti-incumbency after nine years in the office.

Obviously, those statistical tales didn’t help Manmohan Singh and Congress then and the party was reduced to its lowest tally of 44 in the Lok Sabha. Narendra Modi must be having that in mind.

The biggest currency that Narendra Modi has, after two years in government, is – he still has no competition at his level. He is still the most popular politician, one of the most popular prime ministers and the gap between him and others who could pose as his rival to the prime minister’s office in 2019 is comfortably wide. In fact, he is sitting at the top pretty comfortably.

After two years of Narendra Modi in 7RCR, the official residence of India’s prime minister, India, still, has no political alternative to him.

But then, three years is a long time in India’s political landscape. Anything can happen. Let’s see which way the political tide turns (and soars) starting with the Uttar Pradesh assembly elections early next year.

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

TALKING POINTS ON ONE YEAR OF MODI GOVERNMENT

Given the state of political affairs and style of politics in the country, it is to continue. The Modi government will says it has done everything right and is well on the day to make an India it promised and its opponents will deny every such claim – on every pointer – in every sector – on each promise. After all, we don’t talk of and expect ethics and substance in politics anymore.

Narendra Modi then and now, when he took over on May 26, 2014 and what the indices say now, when Modi is completing his maiden year in the office. The usual flavour of the season will be made of the following elements:

— Major schemes of the Modi government – well, by any count, they are around 20, and could be even more – the most important part of the pro-people and anti-people debate

— Land acquisition in the first year – an important aspect of the pro-farmer and anti-farmer debate – high on agenda after the land bill ordinance by the government

— WPI and CPI trends – the monthly trends and the yearly performance – in May 2014 and now – will include debates on inflation, price rise and the state of economy

— Riots in one year – yearly data of riots – accordingly, religious controversies during Modi’s first year in prime-ministerial office

— Avoidable statements in one year – many by the BJP and the NDA leaders in last one year – surely a point where the government needs to work – the critics are expected to exploit the mileage

— Black money measures – it was a big election promise and campaigning point for Narendra Modi and though the government has not been able to bring the stash back home so far, it does have cleared a law to regulate the menace

— Cabinet size trend – maximum governance minimum government – size of Manmohan’s cabinet – Modi’s promise – and his cabinet now

— Foreign policy – with a prime minister circling the world with 18 foreign tours in his first year – a way to look ahead based on the record so far – India’s image does have improved – and so are the attacks of Modi’s political opponents

— How he dealt with Pakistan – he first invited SAARC leaders including Nawaj Sharif for his inauguration – then he cancelled India-Pakistan talks – it’s an year of no ups and more downs in India-Pakistan ties

— GDP in 2013-14 and GDP in 2014-15 – with contribution of each sector

— Sensex and Nifty then and now – the wealth created – the confidence in Indian economy

— IIP trends – IIP of May 2014 Vs IIP now – recovery Vs status quo Vs fall

— Rupee then and now – maintaining a downward trend these days – though is not attracting the intense debate

— FDI-FII in the first year – what were the figures when Modi took over there level now

— Foreign Reserve then and now – how much has it grown in an year since May 2014

— Reforms in one year – reforms stuck in the last one year – Indian economy and therefore Indian society cannot advance unless its policymaking is reformed – an important facet is about the bills passed and stuck in the Parliament

— Disinvestment then and now – part of the reform process – but not much on the front in spite of claims

— What Varanasi got in Modi’s maiden year – it is not just people in Modi’s parliamentary constituency but even analysts and political opponents are keenly watching the concerned developments

So, in Modi’s first year in the PMO, that he is completing tomorrow, as expected, there is much to talk about. And all of it has begun. And we are expected to hear more of them in coming days.

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

AFTER ALL, FIRST NON-CONGRESS GOVERNMENT WITH MAJORITY IS COMPLETING ITS FIRST YEAR..

Tomorrow, the Narendra Modi government, the first non-Congress government with majority, is completing one year in office.

Given the momentous nature of the event, the Modi government, the Bhartiya Janata Party and other parties of the National Democratic Alliance are celebrating the feet with élan.

Narendra Modi is addressing rallies. Arun Jaitley is issuing statements. MPs are visiting and are to visit constituencies and cities to spread the word about achievements of the government. Rallies, exhibitions and pressers are being organized and several events are to be held. The official version of rallies are to be from May 26 to 31.

And as expected, the political opposition is going all out to oppose the government, showing it in a negative light of failures, empty promises and plain rhetoric.

Given the state of political affairs and style of politics in the country, it is to continue.

The Modi government will says it has done everything right and is well on the day to make an India it has promised and its opponents will deny every such claim.

After all, we don’t talk of and expect ethics and substance in the politics of the day anymore.

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

THE UNION BUDGET TO HAVE IMPRINT OF MODI’S POOL OF EXPERTS

The Union Budget tomorrow is going to be the second Budget of the National Democratic Alliance government led by Narendra Modi in nine months.

The first one was presented in July 2014 by the Finance Minister Arun Jaitley after the Modi government was inaugurated in May 2014. Then, the government was just one month into the office, nothing to look back to take steps forward.

Now, nine months into the office, there are developments in retrospect that are needed to be factored in while looking forward. And there will be an intensified level of scrutiny therefore.

In addition to the regular factors affecting the state of the Indian economy, another major element that is going to have its imprint on Budget, is the talent pool of the economists inducted by Narendra Modi in key policymaking functions of his government.

It was already visible in the Rail Budget that focused on consolidating on what is there than to engage in economically insane populism. Sources say the team of experts including the Ministry of Finance Advisor Arvind Subramanian, the NITI Aayog chief Arvind Panagariya and the NITI Aayog member Bibek Debroy and the senior officials of the prime minister’s office played a major role in spreading out the policy concepts on the paper.

They are seen as free market experts believing in the primacy of the market to drive the growth and they are expected to follow the suit with the Union Budget.

We should be ready for a no non-sense Budget that would give enough of talking points, to the proponents, and to the opponents. If there has to be some space for populism, it is expected to be in context of the upcoming Bihar assembly polls later this year and the West Bengal polls in the first half of the next year.

But overall, it is expected to be a balanced Budget intending to kick-start the Modi’s vision of making India a manufacturing hub which can meet its requirements internally and at the same can acts as a hub of the export oriented global financial system.

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey–https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

EULOGIZING GODSE, DEFENDING RELIGIOUS CONVERSION: MODI NEEDS TO REIN THEM IN FOR 2019 RE-ELECTION

Whenever Narendra Modi talks about his vision of India, he talks long term, of continuing governing India at least for the coming two terms, till 2024.

Modi’s reputation on governance and the promises he has made would need that much time and the country and its voters who voted for him would rationally and logically give him the window of these ten years, provided he performs regularly, coming out with report cards on regular intervals that talk of real, solid development.

The political opposition looks nailed and in disarray at the moment. The positive atmosphere for Modi is complemented well with the factors like low international oil prices and healthy inflation rate. His foray in international diplomacy is marching handsomely ahead with Barack Obama as the chief guest of the Republic Day 2015 function.

So, it’s a good harnessing ground for him — except the internal factors of his party, his party’s coalition and the elements of ideology that could potentially derail the show, denying Narendra Modi re-election in 2019.

The country and the voters would expressively reject any attempt to eulogize the likes of Nathuram Godse. Eulogizing a Nathuram Godse is akin to the evil intent to kill the spirit of Mahatma Gandhi, a direct affront on the Indian democratic institution. And that eulogy coming from a member of Parliament from Modi’s party is ominous. It doesn’t matter if the person retracted or not.

The country and the voters don’t need mass religious conversion ceremonies. The country and the voters don’t need the ministers and politicians defending such moves and doing politics over the issue. It leaves most of us, who are looking for development, in bad taste.

The country and the voters don’t need debates or extensions over headlines like ‘India a Hindu nation’. It is simply not acceptable, going by the reality of the India of the day, and its realpolitik of the future.

Narendra Modi needs to rein them in. He must rein them in.

The country and the voters who voted him in have given a mandate in the name of development. The large and ever expanding middle class and the huge youth base vote basically on the priorities that can make their lives better, can ease the basket of monthly burden most of the families have to carry. With majority appeasement and polarization, this was the other major factor that gave BJP majority on its own.

This vote base is demanding and reacts actively. Perform or perish is what should be in government’s mind.

If it slips away, it will be difficult for Modi to come back in 2019.

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/

MANOHAR PARRIKAR AS THE NEXT DEFENCE MINISTER? A NEEDED CHANGE INDEED

Reports say Goa chief minister Manohar Parrikar may be inducted as the next Defence Minister of India.

If that indeed happens, as the Narendra Modi Cabinet expansion is due and is expected to take place during July 9-11, that would indeed by a heartening news.

Though Manohar Parrikar denied it just now and even said that it was a dead news after he came out of the meeting with the prime minister, there are grounds to think so.

The five most important ministries, Home, Defence, External Affairs, Finance and Railways, need five men of highest integrity and credibility in a country like India where much of the social fabric depends on how these ministries function or how the prime minister gets these ministries to task.

Obviously, all the prime minister’s men including the prime minister himself are supposed to following the values reflecting utmost integrity and honesty while running the government. But, we know, practically, that is not possible.

Now, to be frank, we cannot rely on the absolute degrees of these two modes of functioning – how these ministries function – and – how the prime minister gets these ministries to task. For the best case scenario on functional parameters, it has to be the best possible mix of these two.

And induction of a man of personal integrity and honesty like Manohar Parrikar would help Modi in delivering better. This we can say on assessing Modi as the taskmaster, the administrator while discharging his governance related duties. Politics aside, he has established his reputation as a development oriented politician who has delivered.

And Manohar Parrikar is a person like him. If assessed on the overall parameters, he is even better than him. And he can deliver efficiently and effectively, in a ministry that has been riddled with mammoth corruption. The deals have been so murky and controversial that India’s defence preparedness has been effectively pushed back by years. High level officials including at ‘chief level’ are facing probe.

A person like Manohar Parrikar can certainly be the answer to the questions that would be in Narendra Modi’s mind while he would be thinking of reducing Arun Jaitley’s workload who is currently holding the additional charge of the Defence Ministry.

Let’s see how valid this sources based news comes out to be – on Sunday – or on any day during July 9-11. Narendra Modi is in Varanasi November 7-8 and he is leaving for Myanmar on November 12 for a long foreign trip. So, November 9-11 are the ideal days to zero on and the ‘sources’ say it’s going to happen on Sunday.

©/IPR: Santosh Chaubey – https://santoshchaubey.wordpress.com/